eating bugs eating bugs

Tennesee Nydegger-Sandidge (left) and Holly Hook try chowing down on some crickets. "People should eat them because they're good for the planet," says Tennessee. Melissa Banigan hide caption

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Melissa Banigan

The new line of HiSo edible insects. The fried crickets are on the top row, in order: original flavor, cheese, barbecue, seaweed. The fried silkworm pupae snacks are seen on the bottom row, in the same order of flavors. Michael Sullivan for NPR hide caption

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Michael Sullivan for NPR

Street Food No More: Bug Snacks Move To Store Shelves In Thailand

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Neil deGrasse Tyson with a Cambodian cricket rumaki canape, wrapped in bacon. "I have come to surmise, in the culinary universe, that anytime someone feels compelled to wrap something in bacon, it probably doesn't taste very good," he said skeptically before taking a bite. Carole Zimmer for NPR hide caption

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Carole Zimmer for NPR

Black soldier flies mate and lay eggs inside these cages at EnviroFlight. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Making Food From Flies (It's Not That Icky)

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Gordon recommends dusting the deep-fried tarantula spider with smoked paprika. Chugrad McAndrews/Reprinted with permission from The Eat-A-Bug Cookbook hide caption

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Chugrad McAndrews/Reprinted with permission from The Eat-A-Bug Cookbook