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For severe heart failure patients, an LVAD, or left ventricular-assist device, helps the heart pump blood. 7asmin via Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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7asmin via Wikimedia Commons

Screening for lung cancer can catch tumors but it can also produce false positives. Patients need to decide whether it's right for them, but doctors often don't know how to advise them. FS Productions/Getty Images/Blend Images hide caption

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FS Productions/Getty Images/Blend Images

A change in guidelines for breast cancer surgery has resulted in fewer women having to undergo repeat surgeries. Martin J Cook/Getty Images hide caption

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Martin J Cook/Getty Images

Fewer Women Need To Undergo Repeat Surgery After Lumpectomy

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A color-enhanced spiral CT image of the chest shows a large cancerous mass (in yellow) in the left upper lobe. Medical Body Scans/Science Source hide caption

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Medical Body Scans/Science Source

Lung Cancer Screening Program Finds A Lot That's Not Cancer

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Keith Negley for NPR

For Headaches, A Lifestyle Change May Be Better Than A Doctor Visit

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Alan Crawford/iStockphoto

Critics Warn Latest Cholesterol Guidelines Invite Overtreatment

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Stacy Riggs of Fairfax, Va., is prepped for a screening for atrial fibrillation by Life Line Screening medical assistant Kennea Blake at Messiah United Methodist Church in Springfield, Va. Jenny Gold/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Jenny Gold/Kaiser Health News

Some Health Screenings May Harm More Than Help

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