Drug Enforcement Administration Drug Enforcement Administration
Stories About

Drug Enforcement Administration

Regina LaBelle is the acting director of the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy. During a Thursday morning briefing, LaBelle said drug overdose deaths were up about 27% in the 12-month period ending in August 2020, compared with the previous year. White House Office of National Drug Control Policy hide caption

toggle caption
White House Office of National Drug Control Policy

Drug Overdose Deaths Spiked To 88,000 During The Pandemic, White House Says

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/983414684/983576463" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Kratom products are legal in most states and are widely available. But the federal Food and Drug Administration and the Drug Enforcement Administration worry that kratom carries the risk of physical and psychological dependency and, in some people, addiction. Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Catie Dull/NPR

The Kratom Debate: Helpful Herb Or Dangerous Drug?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/789145948/795829734" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This year the Drug Enforcement Administration is accepting electronic vaping devices (provided any lithium ion batteries are removed) during its annual National Prescription Drug Take Back Day event. Lane Turner/The Boston Globe/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Lane Turner/The Boston Globe/Getty Images

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that most new heroin addicts first became hooked on prescription painkillers, such as oxycodone, before graduating to heroin, which is cheaper. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
John Moore/Getty Images

Tales Of Corporate Painkiller Pushing: 'The Death Rates Just Soared'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/753114950/753461186" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A rock of crystal methamphetamine lifted from a suspect in Orange County, Calif. This fall, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention expects to begin collecting more local information about the rising use of meth, cocaine and other stimulants. Leonard Ortiz/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Leonard Ortiz/Getty Images

Seizures Of Methamphetamine Are Surging In The U.S.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/745061185/746366076" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Former Rochester Drug Co-Operative CEO Laurence Doud III, who faces criminal charges stemming from the opioid crisis, leaves the federal courthouse in Manhattan on Tuesday. Kathy Willens/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Kathy Willens/AP

U.S. Attorney William McSwain and colleagues announced a civil lawsuit Wednesday in Philadelphia against the nonprofit Safehouse. "We have a responsibility to step in," McSwain says, though he adds, "We're not bringing a criminal case right now." Emma Lee/WHYY hide caption

toggle caption
Emma Lee/WHYY

A small bag of straight fentanyl on display at the State Crime Lab at the Ohio Attorney General's headquarters of the Bureau of Criminal Investigation in 2015. Nebraska police say they seized 118 pounds of fentanyl in April. The Washington Post/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
The Washington Post/The Washington Post/Getty Images

A Mexican soldier piles poppies for incineration near the town of Tlacotepec, in Guerrero state, Mexico. The army says it slashes and burns poppy when fields are too difficult to access by helicopter or when it wants to protect fruits and vegetables growing nearby. James Fredrick for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
James Fredrick for NPR

On The Hunt For Poppies In Mexico — America's Biggest Heroin Supplier

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/571184153/578083284" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Defendants Efrain Antonio Campos Flores (center left) and Franqui Francisco Flores de Freitas (center right), as depicted in federal court in New York on Thursday, were sentenced to 18 years in prison on drug conspiracy charges. Elizabeth Williams/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Elizabeth Williams/AP

An advocacy group says a move at the Drug Enforcement Administration to hire prosecutors is another signal of how the Justice Department is changing under Attorney General Jeff Sessions. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

A police officer holds a bag of heroin that was confiscated as evidence in Gloucester, Mass., in March. Massachusetts is one of 38 states that allow civil commitment for substance abuse. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
John Moore/Getty Images

A Twist On 'Involuntary Commitment': Some Heroin Users Request It

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/502029334/502211230" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Kratom, seen in capsule form here, has been under review by the Drug Enforcement Administration for possible restriction. Photo illustration by Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Photo illustration by Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The federal government is moving to crack down on kratom, which some people use for chronic pain and to lessen cravings for opioids and alcohol. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Kratom Advocates Speak Out Against Proposed Government Ban

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/493295493/493655011" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Bulgarian border policeman stands near a barbed wire wall on the border with Turkey in July 2014. Experts believe that about two-thirds of the heroin that enters Europe comes through Bulgaria, and that a third of that moves on to the United States. Dimitar Dilkoff/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Dimitar Dilkoff/AFP/Getty Images

Bulgaria Steps Up Efforts Against Drug Trafficking Across Its Borders

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/417000427/417045221" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Hydrocodone, sold as Vicodin and other brand names, may face tighter restrictions on prescribing and use. Toby Talbot/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Toby Talbot/AP