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death and dying

Belmont University's nursing program started hiring actors like Vickie James to help with their end-of-life simulations for students. Blake Farmer/WPLN hide caption

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Blake Farmer/WPLN

Morphine, And A Side Of Grief Counseling: Nursing Students Learn How To Handle Death

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A moment from Embodied Labs' virtual reality video of Clay Crowder, a fictional 66-year-old man with incurable lung cancer. In this scene, Clay's family gathers around his bed, reassuring him that it's OK to let go of life. Embodied Labs hide caption

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Embodied Labs

Doctors in Miami found that a man's tattoo expressing his end-of-life wishes was more confusing than helpful. Gregory Holt/The New England Journal of Medicine hide caption

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Gregory Holt/The New England Journal of Medicine

When A Tattoo Means Life Or Death. Literally

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A recent study shows a link between high discharge rates for live patients and hospice profit margins. Gary Waters/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Nearly 1 In 5 Hospice Patients Discharged While Still Alive

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Caiaimage/Sam Edwards/Getty Images

Doctor Considers The Pitfalls Of Extending Life And Prolonging Death

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Adox and Michaeli with their son, Orion, in the winter of 2015. Courtesy of Christine Gatti hide caption

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Courtesy of Christine Gatti

A Dying Man's Wish To Donate His Organs Gets Complicated

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Matt Larson, shortly after his brain surgery, with his wife, Kelly. Larson says he would like the option to end his life rather than face a painful death. Courtesy of Matt Larson hide caption

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Courtesy of Matt Larson

Debbie Ziegler holds a photo of her late daughter, Brittany Maynard, after the California State Assembly approved a right-to-die measure on Sept. 9. Maynard died on Nov. 1, 2014. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP