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A vineyard worker drives a grape harvester tractor in the Bordeaux region of southwestern France, where climate change is raising new challenges for winemakers. Georges Gobet/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Georges Gobet/AFP/Getty Images

Climate Change Is Disrupting Centuries-Old Methods Of Winemaking In France

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Members of the Oregon Solidarity project include (from left) Ed King and Justin King of King Estate Winery; Christine Clair and Joe Ibrahim of Willamette Valley Vineyards, and Brent Stone and Ray Nuclo, also of King Estate Winery. Carolyn Wells Kramer for NPR hide caption

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Carolyn Wells Kramer for NPR

The champagne grape harvest in northeastern France, like this one near Mailly-Champagne, started early this year due to lack of rain. Francois Nascimbeni/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Francois Nascimbeni/AFP/Getty Images

Champagne Makers Bubble Over A Bumper Crop Caused By European Drought

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Workers in dust masks wash fresh red bell peppers in smoky conditions outside of Eltopia, Wash. Even with the masks, the smoke is still causing tight chests, itchy eyes and dry throats. Anna King/Northwest News Network hide caption

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Anna King/Northwest News Network

As Wildfires Rage, Smoke Chokes Out Farmworkers And Delays Some Crops

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Gary Broomell and his daughter, Debbie, pose behind a sign on their ranch in San Diego County. Their family has been growing citrus for generations, but lately, it's been hard staying in the black growing oranges, so they started a vineyard a few years ago. Lesley McClurg/ Capital Public Radio hide caption

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Lesley McClurg/ Capital Public Radio

Squeezed By Drought, California Farmers Switch To Less Thirsty Crops

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