San Bernardino San Bernardino

Fire crews made significant progress Wednesday in containing the Pilot Fire in California's San Bernardino Mountains. It's one of three major fires currently burning in the state. Mark Boster/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Boster/LA Times via Getty Images

Everytown for Gun Safety teaches survivors of shootings how to use their stories to advocate for gun control legislation. Ruby Wallau/NPR hide caption

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Ruby Wallau/NPR

A Million-Mom Army And A Billionaire Take On The NRA

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Prosecutor Cody Hiland speaks at a news conference in Conway, Ark., on Aug. 7, after two teenagers were charged in the murders of Robert and Patricia Cogdell. On Wednesday, the FBI agreed to help the Faulkner County prosecutor get access to an iPhone and iPod that belonged to the suspects. Danny Johnston/AP hide caption

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Danny Johnston/AP

Authorities search for a suspect following the shooting that killed 14 people on Dec. 2, 2015, in San Bernardino, Calif. The public was able to follow the manhunt by listening to police radio communications streaming online. Chris Carlson/AP hide caption

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Chris Carlson/AP

Police Radio Chatter Is Open To All Ears. But Should It Be?

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FBI Director James Comey told a congressional hearing on March 1, that encryption was creating "warrantproof" devices. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

How A Foiled Robbery Sheds Light On Apple's Clash With The FBI

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Lawyer Ted Olson, shown at the Los Angeles premiere of HBO's The Case Against 8 in 2014, is representing Apple in its legal faceoff with federal investigators. Frazer Harrison/Getty Images hide caption

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Frazer Harrison/Getty Images

Lawyer For Apple: 'What In The Law Requires Us To Redesign The iPhone?'

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San Bernardino Chief of Police Jarrod Burguan says the search of the iPhone used by one of the shooters is "an effort to leave no stone unturned" in the investigation of the Dec. 2 terrorist attack. Robert Gauthier/LA Times/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Gauthier/LA Times/Getty Images

San Bernardino Police Chief Sees Chance Nothing Of Value On Shooter's iPhone

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Director of the National Intelligence James Clapper, seated at the table meets with the Senate Intelligence Committee Feb. 9, including Chairman Richard Burr, R-N.C. Burr and the committee's minority leader, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., are working on a bill that would force companies like Apple to help prosecutors unlock the phones of criminal suspects. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

In Apple-FBI Fight, Congress Considers Aggressive And Measured Approaches

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Apple CEO Tim Cook says creating new software to break into a locked iPhone would be "bad news" and "we would never write it." He spoke with ABC News' World News Tonight with David Muir. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

Apple CEO Tim Cook: Backdoor To iPhones Would Be Software Equivalent Of Cancer

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The Seeds Of Apple's Standoff With DOJ May Have Been Sown In Brooklyn

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A man walks outside the Apple store on Fifth Avenue in New York City on Wednesday. Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images

FBI Director James Comey has said enhanced security on cellphones and other devices blunts the bureau's ability to find terrorists before they strike or to prosecute them if they are caught. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

A U.S. magistrate judge has ordered Apple to help the FBI break into an iPhone used by one of the two shooters in the San Bernardino attack in December. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Marc Rotenberg, head of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, opposes phones that would have a built-in backdoor. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

A Privacy Advocate's View Of Ordering Apple To Help Unlock Shooter's iPhone

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