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Ownership of "Statue of a Victorious Youth," a bronze sculpture of ancient Greek origin, is being disputed. An American museum is trying to keep it. Digital image courtesy of the Getty's Open Content Program. hide caption

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Digital image courtesy of the Getty's Open Content Program.

New York City says it will erect a statue of Shirley Chisholm, the first black woman elected to Congress. Chisholm is seen here in a Brooklyn church in January 1972, announcing her bid for the Democratic nomination for president. Don Hogan Charles/Getty Images hide caption

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Don Hogan Charles/Getty Images

A statue of surgeon J. Marion Sims is taken down from its pedestal in Central Park on Tuesday. A New York City panel decided to move the controversial statue after outcry, because many of Sims' medical breakthroughs came from experimenting on enslaved black women without anesthesia. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

A "comfort woman" statue is placed on a bus seat to mark the 5th International Memorial Day for Comfort Women in Seoul in August. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP

'Comfort Woman' Memorial Statues, A Thorn In Japan's Side, Now Sit On Korean Buses

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Baltimore removed four statues with Confederate ties on Aug. 16 under the cover of darkness, in a five-hour operation ordered by Mayor Catherine Pugh. Merrit Kennedy/NPR hide caption

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Merrit Kennedy/NPR

Baltimore Took Down Confederate Monuments. Now It Has To Decide What To Do With Them

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Crews worked to remove the statue of Supreme Court judge and segregationist Roger Taney from the front lawn of the Maryland State House late Thursday night. Taney wrote the 1857 Dred Scott decision that defended slavery and said black Americans could never be citizens. Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images

The Charging Bull and Fearless Girl square off in New York City's financial district. Arturo Di Modica, the bull's sculptor, says the girl staring it down has changed the meaning of his work in an unwelcome way. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

A model of a Karl Marx statue was briefly on display in central Trier earlier this month. City of Trier Press Office hide caption

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City of Trier Press Office

German City Accepts Karl Marx Statue From China, But Not Everyone's Happy

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A sandstone statue of Rishabhanata, from Rajasthan or Madhya Pradesh, India, in the 10th century A.D., flanked by a pair of attendants. It is valued at approximately $150,000. U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement hide caption

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U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement

A bronze sculpture of Lucille Ball is displayed in Lucille Ball Memorial Park in her hometown of Celoron, N.Y. Since the sculpture was unveiled in 2009, it has been blasted by critics who say it bears little or no likeness to the popular 1950s sitcom actress and comedian. The Post-Journal/AP hide caption

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The Post-Journal/AP