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heat stroke

NASA reports July 2023 as the hottest month on record. David McNew/Getty Images/David McNew hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images/David McNew

EMTs help a patient in Austin, Texas, this week. The man had passed out near the state capitol and was dehydrated. Cities with few trees and areas of shade are hotter during heat waves. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

How heat makes health inequity worse, hitting people with risks like diabetes harder

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When patients arrive with heat stroke, medical teams quickly cover them from head to toe with bagged or even loose ice to lower their core temperatures back below 100 Fahrenheit, according to Dr. Jeffrey Elder, who leads emergency management at the New Orlean's largest hospital, University Medical Center. ER staffers also use misting fans on patients and administer IV fluids for rapid rehydration. Drew Hawkins/Gulf States Newsroom hide caption

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Drew Hawkins/Gulf States Newsroom

In 2006, Waikiki Beach was near empty of swimmers due to a sewage spill which diverted millions of gallons of raw sewage into a nearby canal. Marco Garcia/Getty Images hide caption

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Marco Garcia/Getty Images

Heat can be deadly, as this sign in Death Valley National Park warns. Some of the hottest temperatures in the world have been recorded here. But it doesn't need to be 130 degrees out to be dangerous. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

How heat kills: What happens to the body in extreme temperatures

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Luna the French Bulldog dressed up for the National Independence Day Parade in Washington, DC, on July 4th. Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Heat wave chuchart duangdaw/Getty Images hide caption

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chuchart duangdaw/Getty Images

Mario Ramos (left) and wife Tally adjust their umbrellas in Laguna Beach, Calif. The state was among a number of places this summer that experienced their highest temperatures on record. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Portugal's Cristiano Ronaldo takes a water break during the 2014 World Cup soccer match between Portugal and the U.S. in Manaus, Brazil, on June 22. Siphiwe Sibeko/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Siphiwe Sibeko/Reuters/Landov