Obamacare Obamacare

Marilyn Kruse couldn't get health insurance through her job as a substitute teacher in Jefferson County, Colo. Now she buys insurance through the state's health exchange. John Daley/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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John Daley/Colorado Public Radio

In Colorado, More People Are Insured But Cost Remains An Issue

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At sign-up events like this one in Los Angeles in 2013, Covered California pledged "affordability" in health insurance as one of its main selling points. Lucy Nicholson/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Lucy Nicholson/Reuters/Landov

The IRS released preliminary figures that show about three-quarters of taxpayers indicated they had qualifying health insurance in 2014. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

President Obama and Vice President Biden shake hands after the president spoke in the White House's Rose Garden Thursday about the Supreme Court decision in favor of Obamacare. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Supporters of the Affordable Care Act rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., on March 4. The Supreme Court is considering the case of King v. Burwell, which could determine the fate of health care subsidies for millions of people. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images
Elly Walton/Ikon Images/Corbis

Defeat By Deductible: Millennials Aren't Hip To Health Insurance Lingo

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A Tea Party supporter rings a bell in protest of the health care law in front of the U.S. Supreme Court, as Obamacare supporters shout behind her. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Health plans begun under the Affordable Care Act are required to cover FDA-approved contraceptive methods without cost to members. Older plans are exempt from that rule. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

People protesting against the Affordable Care Act rallied outside the Supreme Court in March, before arguments in the second major challenge to the law. Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA/Landov

Retired California school teacher Mikkel Lawrence sits with his cat, Max. Lawrence has hepatitis C and has struggled to afford the medicine he needs to treat it. April Dembosky/KQED hide caption

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April Dembosky/KQED

More than 80 percent of the people getting federal subsidies to defray the cost of their monthly health insurance premiums have jobs, statistics suggest. And many are middle class. Jen Grantham/iStockphoto hide caption

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Jen Grantham/iStockphoto

Low, Middle Income Workers Most Vulnerable To Loss Of Obamacare Subsidies

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