higher education higher education

Two roommates in the 1950s study in their Duke University dormitory. The school has decided to bring back largely random roommate pairings. Duke University Archives hide caption

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Duke University Archives

Why Duke University Won't Honor Freshman Roommate Requests This Fall

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Williams College, seen here, is one of the institutions that reportedly received a letter from the Justice Department about communications with other colleges regarding students admitted via early decision. John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images

Caleb Torres, a senior at George Washington University, says he ran out of grocery money his freshmen year, so he began skipping meals. The Washington Post/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Food, Housing Insecurity May Be Keeping College Students From Graduating

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Education Secretary Betsy DeVos (right) toured public schools in Puerto Rico this week with Puerto Rico Secretary of Education Dr. Julia Keleher (left) and Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rosselló (second from left). Courtesy of the Puerto Rico Department of Eduaction hide caption

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Courtesy of the Puerto Rico Department of Eduaction

In a recent study from National Center for Education Statistics found even after controlling for academic achievement in high school, black and Latino students attend selective institutions at far lower rates and drop out of college more often. Cesar Okada/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Cesar Okada/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Eric Greitens, shortly before becoming governor of Missouri in January 2017. To address a revenue shortfall, Greitens cut $68 million in spending for the state's higher education system shortly after taking office. Orlin Wagner/AP hide caption

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Orlin Wagner/AP

As State Budget Revenues Fall Short, Higher Education Faces A Squeeze

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Picketers hold signs near Pennsylvania's West Chester University on Wednesday. Professors at state universities, including West Chester, came to a tentative contract agreement with the state on Friday. Megan Trimble/AP hide caption

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Megan Trimble/AP

Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin, seen here at a GOP event in April, overstepped his authority when he imposed a 4.5 percent budget cut on the state's university and community college system, the state's supreme court says. Darron Cummings/AP hide caption

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Darron Cummings/AP

Jeffrey Wood has been studying at the Hopkins-Nanjing Center for Chinese and American Studies. He is now preparing for a career as a diplomat. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

For U.S. Minority Students In China, The Welcome Comes With Scrutiny

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Students take part in a protest at the University of Hong Kong on Jan. 20. They protested after a pro-Beijing official was appointed to a senior role, amid growing worry over increasing political interference in academia. Philippe Lopez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Philippe Lopez/AFP/Getty Images

In Hong Kong, A Tussle Over Academic Freedom

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Kiron University, geared to refugees and displaced people, offers two years of online study toward a bachelor's degree. Students complete the degree at partner universities. Via Kiron University hide caption

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Via Kiron University

As Migrants Pour In, Germany Launches Online University For Them

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Berlin's Humboldt University — named for its founder, the 19th century philosopher and linguist Wilhelm von Humboldt, and his brother, naturalist Alexander von Humboldt, pictured here — is one of several German universities attracting U.S. students. More than 4,000 Americans are studying in German universities. Markus Schreiber/AP hide caption

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Markus Schreiber/AP

For Americans Seeking Affordable Degrees, German Schools Beckon

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The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill faces charges of NCAA violations including the existence of sham classes and grade inflation for student-athletes. Gerry Broome/AP hide caption

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Gerry Broome/AP

Academic Foul: Some Colleges Accused Of Helping Athletes Cheat

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Syrian children listen to a teacher during a lesson in a temporary classroom in Suruc refugee camp on March 25 in Suruc, Turkey. The camp is the largest of its kind in Turkey with a population of about 35,000 Syrians who have fled the ongoing civil war in their country. Carl Court/Getty Images hide caption

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Carl Court/Getty Images

Turkish Educator Pledges $10M To Set Up Universities For Syrian Refugees

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An employee at the American Disposables Inc. factory works on the assembly line in October 2009 in Ware, Mass. The state has seen rapidly expanding income disparity in the past 50 years as highly educated tech and financial workers have seen big gains and inflation-adjusted income has shrunk for the poorest residents. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images