Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg
Stories About

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Los Angeles artist Erik Brunetti, the founder of the streetwear clothing company "FUCT," leaves the Supreme Court after his trademark case was argued on Monday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Supreme Court Dances Around The F-Word With Real Potential Financial Consequences

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/713632552/713702101" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Crews remove early morning snow during a winter storm at the Supreme Court on Wednesday. It's not unusual for the high court to be open when the rest of Washington is closed. Jessica Gresko/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jessica Gresko/AP

Supreme Court Limits Civil Asset Forfeiture, Rules Excessive Fines Apply To States

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/696360090/696532435" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg (left) takes the oath of office in August 1993 as President Bill Clinton looks on. A new album, Notorious RBG in Song sets events from Ginsburg's life to music. Kort Duce/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Kort Duce/AFP/Getty Images

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's Life Immortalized In Song

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/623893240/630008659" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Then-Supreme Court nominee Ruth Bader Ginsburg greets her husband, Martin, during her confirmation hearing in 1993. She didn't hesitate to answer questions about Roe v. Wade and other topics she considered settled law. John Duricka/AP hide caption

toggle caption
John Duricka/AP

The Ginsburg Rule: False Advertising By The GOP

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/628626965/629019410" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Immigrants pose with U.S citizenship certificates in front of a large U.S. flag after a naturalization ceremony at the Los Angeles Convention Center in February. A Supreme Court decision Monday will put the foreign-born children of unmarried American fathers on equal footing with those of unwed American mothers. That may mean longer waits for the latter, at least in the short term. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jae C. Hong/AP

High Court Strikes Down Law Favoring Unwed Mothers Over Unwed Fathers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/532674073/532682872" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">