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Attorney Bruce Castor represented former President Donald Trump at his Senate trial after the House of Representatives impeached Trump for the second time. Castor is now defending two people facing misdemeanor charges related to the Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol riot. Senate Television via AP hide caption

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Senate Television via AP

Trump Impeachment Lawyers Are Now Representing Capitol Riot Defendants

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South Dakota Attorney General Jason Ravnsborg, pictured in 2019, is facing impeachment proceedings and calls to resign after the release of new details about the September 2020 car crash in which he fatally struck a pedestrian. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Sen. Ben Sasse, R-Neb., is one of seven Republicans who voted to convict former President Donald Trump during the most recent impeachment trial. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Sen. Ben Sasse: GOP Must Persuade Voters It Has A Vision Beyond Donald Trump

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Del. Stacey Plaskett, one of the House managers in former President Donald Trump's Senate impeachment trial, defends the decision not to call witnesses. "As all Americans believed at that moment, the evidence was overwhelming," she says. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Stacey Plaskett: Trump Trial Needed 'More Senators With Spines, Not More Witnesses'

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The Senate has voted to acquit former President Donald Trump on an impeachment charge of inciting an insurrection. In a statement, Trump thanked his legal team and members of Congress "who stood proudly for the Constitution." Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

President Biden, meeting with business leaders about the $1.9 trillion COVID-19 aid package on Tuesday, said he is not watching the Senate impeachment trial of his predecessor. Pete Marovich/Getty Images hide caption

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Pete Marovich/Getty Images

Butch Bowers, who joined former President Donald Trump's defense team as a top impeachment lawyer, has parted ways with Trump, just nine days before his trial. C. Aluka Berry/The State/Tribune News Service via Getty Images hide caption

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C. Aluka Berry/The State/Tribune News Service via Getty Images

U.S. Rep. Tom Rice, pictured in 2019, was formally censured by South Carolina's Republican Party Saturday for his support of Trump's impeachment. Rice was one of only 10 House Republicans to join Democrats in voting to impeach. Meg Kinnard/AP hide caption

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Meg Kinnard/AP

The impeachment trial of President Andrew Johnson in the Senate on March 13, 1868. The House approved 11 articles of impeachment against Andrew Johnson. After a 74-day Senate trial, the Senate acquitted Johnson on three of the articles by a one-vote margin each and decided not to vote on the remaining articles. Library of Congress/Getty Images hide caption

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Library of Congress/Getty Images

A number of GOP members — including the No. 3 House Republican — have already said they will vote for impeachment. A Democrat from a Trump-voting district sees several more Republicans joining the vote to impeach. Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images

Up To 12 House Republicans May Vote For Trump Impeachment, Democratic Lawmaker Says

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Rep. Ilhan Omar, seen here in 2019, said Wednesday that she is drafting articles of impeachment against President Trump, as pro-Trump extremists stormed the U.S. Capitol. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Florida Rep. Val Demings compares the impeachment saga to police work. As a former cop, she says police will make arrests to stop a threat — regardless of how a court will rule later. Kisha Ravi/NPR hide caption

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Kisha Ravi/NPR

Val Demings Says House Impeachment Managers 'Made Our Case'

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President Bill Clinton gave his 1999 State of the Union address during his impeachment trial, just as President Trump will on Tuesday. Gamma Liaison/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Gamma Liaison/Pool/Getty Images

Trump Delivers State Of The Union As Impeachment Vote Looms. So Did Clinton

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In this July 27, 1974, file photo, Rep. Thomas Railsback, R-Ill., right, confers with chairman Peter Rodino, D-N.J., during the House Judiciary Committee's debate on impeachment articles drafted against President Richard Nixon. AP hide caption

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AP

Remembering A Congressman Who Bucked His Party On An Impeachment

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