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impeachment

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell laughed Monday when asked about Democrats' decision to delay sending articles of impeachment to his chamber. The tension comes amid debate over whether the trial will include witnesses. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

White House counsel Pat Cipollone typically works behind the scenes. That's about to change when he takes a central role in President Trump's Senate impeachment trial. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Trump Impeachment Trial Turns Spotlight On White House Lawyer Cipollone

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"It became pretty clear pretty quickly, unambiguously that the president had misused his office for personal political gain" from evidence presented in impeachment proceedings against President Trump, says Christianity Today Editor-in-Chief Mark Galli. Joshua Roberts/Reuters hide caption

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Joshua Roberts/Reuters

Calling Trump 'Morally Lost,' 'Christianity Today' Editor Calls For His Removal

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Views on impeachment are nearly evenly split, according to a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist Poll, with 48% against and 47% in support. Above, President Trump speaks in the Oval Office on Dec. 13. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Rep. Jeff Van Drew, D-N.J., who has opposed the impeachment of President Trump for months, is planning to jump to the Republican Party. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Imag hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Imag

Impeachable offenses were listed on a monitor as the House Judiciary Committee listened to testimony by constitutional scholars earlier this week. Saul Loeb/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/Pool/Getty Images

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., has said he could decide to amend the panel's report on its impeachment investigation if new evidence is discovered. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

President Trump travels to London on Monday. But as the House Judiciary Committee holds its first hearing, it's unlikely Trump will be able to leave the impeachment inquiry behind. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Impeachment Looms Over Trump Trip Abroad, As It Did For Clinton In 1998

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U.S. Iran Tensions May Be Coming To A Head; Is The White House Prepared?

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Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks at an economic forum in Moscow on Nov. 20. "Thank God no one is accusing us anymore of interfering in the U.S. elections. Now they're accusing Ukraine," he said. Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP hide caption

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Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP

The View From Moscow On The Trump Impeachment Inquiry

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Trump ally Sen. Lindsey Graham shared that White House officials are still holding out hope that the president may not get impeached by the House of Representatives. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Republican Senators, White House Map Out Impeachment Trial

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U.S. Ambassador to the EU Gordon Sondland on Capitol Hill on Oct. 17. Sondland will give much-anticipated public testimony Wednesday in the impeachment inquiry of President Trump. His story has changed since he first testified last month. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Gordon Sondland Returns To Impeachment Inquiry As A Key Witness With An Updated Story

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Daniel Wood/NPR

Poll: Americans Overwhelmingly Say Impeachment Hearings Won't Change Their Minds

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Gordon Sondland, the U.S. ambassador to the European Union, is likely the most anticipated of the eight witnesses scheduled to testify in this week's public impeachment hearings. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., talks to reporters after the first public hearing in the impeachment probe of President Trump. The House is looking into his effort to tie U.S. aid for Ukraine to investigations of his political opponents. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Ambassador William Taylor is the first witness to appear in the first public impeachment hearing on Wednesday. He's a career diplomat who outlined the effort to get Ukraine's president to commit to political investigations in return for military assistance. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Jennifer Williams, a foreign service officer detailed to work in Vice President Pence's office, arrives for a deposition on Capitol Hill on Thursday. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Volodymyr Zelenskiy enters a hall in Kyiv on March 6 to take part in the taping of the television series Servant of the People. His role on the show was as a fictional president of Ukraine. Sergei Supinsky/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sergei Supinsky/AFP/Getty Images

How Ukraine's President Wound Up In The Middle Of The Trump Impeachment Inquiry

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President Trump's acting Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney answers questions at the White House on Oct. 17. Win McNamee/Getty Images Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Conservatives Urge Trump To Keep Mick Mulvaney As Chief Of Staff

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