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Women grieve as the coffin of one of the 24 migrants who drowned while trying to reach Italy, is buried in Santa Maria Addolorata Cemetery on the outskirts of Valletta, Malta, on April 23, 2015. The migrants died as a smuggler's boat crammed with hundreds of people overturned off the coast of Libya. Alessandra Tarantino/AP hide caption

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Alessandra Tarantino/AP

'I Do This For The Families': The Daunting Task Of Identifying Missing Migrants

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A double set of fences topped with barbed wire circles this outdoor decomposition site outside Grand Junction, Colo. The barrier thwarts prying eyes and protects the curious from an unpleasant surprise. Rae Ellen Bichell/NPR hide caption

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Rae Ellen Bichell/NPR

To Solve Gruesome Desert Mysteries, Scientists Become Body Collectors

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The Belgian flag flies at half-mast at the Koningin Astrid-Reine Astrid military hospital in Brussels on March 24, 2016. Some of the people wounded in the Brussels attacks are being treated there. Patrik Stollarz/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Patrik Stollarz/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Forensics Lab Director Ken Goddard holds a wood sample used in the lab's forensic work in Ashland, Ore. Jes Burns/OPB/EarthFix hide caption

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Jes Burns/OPB/EarthFix

Wildlife Forensics Lab Uses Tech To Sniff, Identify Illegal Wood

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Dallas Mildenhall, New Zealand's forensic pollen expert, peers at samples through a microscope. Courtesy of David Wolman hide caption

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Courtesy of David Wolman

Solving Crimes With Pollen, One Grain Of Evidence At A Time

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Knight (left) and Bucheli take soil samples from beneath one of the decomposing bodies. Katie Hayes Luke for NPR hide caption

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Katie Hayes Luke for NPR

Could Detectives Use Microbes To Solve Murders?

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A Thai medic checks bodies for forensic identity in Phang Nga province in southern of Thailand on Jan. 11, 2005. Thousands of people were killed in Thailand after a massive tsunami struck on Dec. 26, 2004. Pornchai Kittiwongsakul/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Pornchai Kittiwongsakul/AFP/Getty Images