trolls trolls

Internet activist Lyudmila Savchuk spent two months working in a "troll factory" in St. Petersburg, Russia. She was tasked with writing posts that would inflame anti-American sentiment among Russians. Others at the factory would write negative posts about American politicians, the war in Ukraine and America's NATO allies. Jolie Myers/NPR hide caption

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Jolie Myers/NPR

Meet The Activist Who Uncovered The Russian Troll Factory Named In The Mueller Probe

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A hammock-canoe drawing, U.S. Patent No. 299,951, is displayed in a June 1884 publication of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office in Alexandria, Va. Critics of the patent system say it's too easy for people to save a slew of semi-realistic ideas, then sue when a firm separately tries to make something similar. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

Some colleges and police departments are starting to use software that scans social media to identify local threats, but most tips still come from members of the public. Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Ikon Images/Getty Images

Awash In Social Media, Cops Still Need The Public To Detect Threats

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