behavioral psychology behavioral psychology
Ryan Johnson for NPR

Smartphone Detox: How To Power Down In A Wired World

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People who think they're more slothlike than peers may change their behavior to actually become less active. Oivind Hovland/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Oivind Hovland/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Just Thinking You're Slacking On Exercise Could Boost Risk Of Death

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Marina Muun for NPR

Invisibilia: A Man Finds An Explosive Emotion Locked In A Word

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Isabel Seliger for NPR

Total Failure: When The Space Shuttle Didn't Come Home

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Would having to wait 25 seconds for your snack prompt you to make healthier choices at the vending machine? New research suggests the answer is yes. M. Spencer Green/AP hide caption

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M. Spencer Green/AP

A computer analysis found that people with the same name were more likely to share similar expressions around their eyes and mouths, areas of the face that are easier to adjust. Courtesy of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology hide caption

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Courtesy of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

Uncertainty about the future can raise stress levels, psychologists say. Here, students in Charlotte, N.C., hold hands during a Sept. 21 protest after Keith Lamont Scott was shot and killed by a police officer. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Researchers are trying to tease apart the reasons why girls are less likely to become scientists and engineers. Marc Romanelli/Getty Images/Blend Images hide caption

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Marc Romanelli/Getty Images/Blend Images

Hiroyuki Yamamoto, a crossing guard in Matsudo, Japan, has been trained in how to recognize and gently approach people who are wandering, or have other signs of dementia, in ways that won't frighten them. Ina Jaffe/NPR hide caption

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Ina Jaffe/NPR

Japanese City Takes Community Approach To Dealing With Dementia

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Invisibilia: He Mocked Celebrity, Then Came To Crave It Himself

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Manual Cinema/NPR

She Offered The Robber A Glass Of Wine, And That Flipped The Script

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Allan Aarslev, a police superintendent in Aarhus, became part of the effort to make young Muslims feel like they have a future in Denmark. Scanpix Denmark/USAScanpix/Sipa hide caption

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Scanpix Denmark/USAScanpix/Sipa

A mother watches a video taken of herself playing with her daughter while at Bellevue Hospital in New York for a checkup. Brenda Woodford provides coaching on parenting skills. Courtesy of Children of Bellevue Archives hide caption

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Courtesy of Children of Bellevue Archives