2020 2020

Supporters of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump watch as Fox News projects him the winner in Florida on Nov. 8, 2016. Fox is joining the Associated Press in a new experiment to measure voter preferences, which will be key to their projections on election night in 2018. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Wendy Becker (left) and Mary Norton of Providence, R.I., raise their hands after the 2006 Massachusetts court ruling that allowed same-sex couples from Rhode Island to marry in Massachusetts. For the 2020 census, the couple can choose the new response category for "same-sex husband/wife/spouse." Boston Globe/Getty Images hide caption

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Boston Globe/Getty Images

2020 Census Will Ask About Same-Sex Relationships

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Mulusew Bekele, director of program operations at African Services Committee based in New York City, supports the U.S. Census Bureau's efforts to collect more detailed data on black people's non-Hispanic origins on the 2020 census. "The more refined data, the better for public policy," he says. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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2020 Census Will Ask Black People About Their Exact Origins

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From left to right, Tommy Shiels, Dennis Hayden, John Houlihan and Thomas Ring attend the New York Irish Center's weekly luncheon for seniors in Queens, N.Y. Many attendees say they support the 2020 census asking white people about their origins. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

2020 Census Will Ask White People More About Their Ethnicities

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Oprah Winfrey accepts the 2018 Cecil B. DeMille Award during the 75th Annual Golden Globe Awards at The Beverly Hilton Hotel on Sunday. Winfrey's speech spurred talk of a possible presidential run. NBCUniversal via Getty Images hide caption

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NBCUniversal via Getty Images

Oprah Winfrey, recipient of the Cecil B. DeMille Award, gave a rousing Golden Globes speech that spurred talk of a 2020 presidential run. Kevork Djansezian/NBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images hide caption

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Kevork Djansezian/NBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images
Chelsea Beck/NPR

Here's Why The Census Started Counting Latinos, And How That Could Change In 2020

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The 2020 election cycle might have already started. The Federal Election Commission shows that 129 people have filed to run for president in the next election. Annette Elizabeth Allen for NPR hide caption

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Annette Elizabeth Allen for NPR