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Signs in a Chicago shop window advertise e-cigarettes and pods from Juul in September. Altria, the parent company of Philip Morris, announced Thursday it would buy a 35 percent stake in the company. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Jerome Adams said Tuesday that local restrictions, including bans on indoor vaping, are needed to reduce youth e-cigarette use. Eric Baradat/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Baradat/AFP/Getty Images

There's been an increase in vaping in teens, but e-cigarette manufacturers say it's a safer alternative to smoking. Martina Paraninfi/Getty Images hide caption

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Martina Paraninfi/Getty Images

FDA Cracks Down On E-Cigarette Sales To Curb Teen Vaping

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An unidentified 15-year-old student at a high school in Cambridge, Mass., vaped near campus in April. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

FDA Intensifies Crackdown On E-Cigarette Sales To Teenagers

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Julien Lavandier, a Colorado State University student, started smoking e-cigarettes as a high school sophomore. He says he's now hooked on Juul and has been unable to quit. John Daley / CPR News hide caption

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John Daley / CPR News

He Started Vaping As A Teen And Now Says Habit Is 'Impossible To Let Go'

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Nicotine, heavy metals and tiny particles that can harm the lungs have been found in e-cigarette aerosol, according to the surgeon general. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

E-Liquid (right) with labeling that resembles kid-friendly candy (left). FDA/Flickr hide caption

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FDA/Flickr

Federal Government Sends Warning To Vaping Companies

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Philip Morris' iQOS device heats tobacco but stops short of burning it, an approach the company says reduces exposure to tar and other toxic byproducts of burning cigarettes. Philip Morris via AP hide caption

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Philip Morris via AP

FDA Panel Gives Qualified Support To Claims For 'Safer' Smoking Device

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Vapor from e-cigarettes contains toxins, although fewer than conventional cigarettes. mauro_grigollo/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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mauro_grigollo/Getty Images/iStockphoto

E-Cigarettes Likely Encourage Kids To Try Tobacco But May Help Adults Quit

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The state of New York is putting e-cigarettes into the same category as regular tobacco cigarettes, under new restrictions signed into law this week. Here, a man uses a vape device in London last summer, next to a No Smoking sign. Tolga Akmen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tolga Akmen/AFP/Getty Images

The liquid used in e-cigarettes comes in fruit and candy flavors like cherry and peppermint. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images

Teens' Use Of E-Cigarettes Drops For The First Time, CDC Says

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Backers of California's Proposition 56 hope to hit people hard enough in the wallet that they quit smoking. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP

Would California's Proposed Tobacco Tax Hike Reduce Smoking?

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California is the second state to raise the legal age for purchasing tobacco products from 18 to 21. A similar law went into effect in Hawaii on Jan. 1. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images

E-cigarette vaporizers are displayed at Digital Ciggz in San Rafael, Calif. The Department of Transportation says you definitely can't use this or anything else to vape on a plane. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

E-cigarettes work by heating up a fluid that contains the drug nicotine, producing a vapor that users inhale. The devices are most popular among young adults, ages 18 to 24, a federal survey indicates. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Most E-Cigarette Users Are Current And Ex-Smokers, Not Newbies

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