firearms firearms

Sales surged for guns, such as these seen at a show in Kenner, La., in late 2012, after the mass shooting in Newtown, Conn. Julie Dermansky/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Julie Dermansky/Corbis via Getty Images

People line up to donate blood at a special United Blood Services drive at a University Medical Center facility to help victims of the mass shooting Sunday in Las Vegas. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Firearms using lead ammunition spray lead dust out of the muzzle and ejection port when fired. Herra Kuulapaa Precires/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Herra Kuulapaa Precires/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

Firearms salesman Nathan Williams at the Outdoorsman gun shop in Santa Fe, N.M., on Jan. 5. Since Donald Trump's election, background checks have fallen three straight months from year-ago levels. Morgan Lee/AP hide caption

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Morgan Lee/AP

'Democrats Are Good For Gun Sales': Guess What Happened After Trump's Election

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The trade in alcohol — illegal under Prohibition — led to the rise of organized crime and men such as Chicago gangster Al Capone, photographed here on Jan. 19, 1931. AP hide caption

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AP

Prohibition-Era Gang Violence Spurred Congress To Pass First Gun Law

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The U.S. Supreme Court ruled on a number of cases on Monday, including whether people who have domestic violence convictions should have access to firearms. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

A Sig Sauer MCX rifle can be seen on display at the top left of this photo as NRA gun enthusiasts view the Sig Sauer display at the National Rifle Association's annual meetings & exhibits show in Louisville, Ky., in May. John Sommers II/Reuters hide caption

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John Sommers II/Reuters

Anti-gun groups and state officials joined New Yorkers Against Gun Violence to mark the sixth month anniversary of the Newtown massacre on the steps of New York City Hall in 2013. Bebeto Matthews/AP hide caption

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Bebeto Matthews/AP

Gun Stocks Up, But Activists Move To Expand Anti-Investment Push

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Closing loopholes in background checks for gun purchases would reduce the risk of death and injury, doctors' and attorneys' groups say. Alexa Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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Alexa Miller/Getty Images

In 2010, Omar Thornton killed eight colleagues in Manchester, Conn., before killing himself. Private employers used to create their own rules about guns on their property. But over the past five years, many states have adopted laws that allow employees to keep firearms in their vehicles at work. Douglas Healey/Getty Images hide caption

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Douglas Healey/Getty Images

Do Guns On The Premises Make Workplaces Safer?

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The Armatix smart gun is implanted with an electronic chip that allows it to be fired only if the shooter is wearing a watch that communicates with it through a radio signal. It is not sold in the U.S. Michael Dalder/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Michael Dalder/Reuters/Landov

A New Jersey Law That's Kept Smart Guns Off Shelves Nationwide

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Flags fly at half-staff Tuesday after the deadly shootings at the Navy Yard in Washington, D.C. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP