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sea urchins

A sea otter in Monterey Bay with a rock anvil on its belly and a scallop in its forepaws. Jessica Fujii hide caption

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Jessica Fujii

When sea otters lose their favorite foods, they can use tools to go after new ones

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A container at the Bodega Marine Lab in California holds hundreds of purple urchins harvested from the Mendocino County coast where they have been destroying kelp forests. Terry Chea/AP hide caption

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Terry Chea/AP

The Purple Urchins Don't Die

NPR climate correspondent Lauren Sommer explains how scientists are getting creative to deal with the hordes of urchins overtaking kelp forests in the Pacific Ocean — and why this kind of drastic ecological change may become more common as the climate gets hotter.

The Purple Urchins Don't Die

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Since purple sea urchins have eaten up their food supply, many of them are empty inside. Erika Mahoney/KAZU hide caption

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Erika Mahoney/KAZU

Saving California's Kelp Forest May Depend On Eating Purple Sea Urchins

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Sea urchins are considered a culinary delicacy, but supply can't keep up with demand. Aizat Faiz/Flickr hide caption

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Aizat Faiz/Flickr