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Federal employees wait in line at World Central Kitchen, a food bank and food distribution center established by celebrity chef José Andrés. The federal government is back open, but it could be several days before workers receive missed paychecks. Alex Edelman/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Edelman/AFP/Getty Images

Federal Employees Return To Work, But Fears Of Another Shutdown Loom

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IRS employee Pam Crosbie and others hold signs protesting the government shutdown at a federal building in Ogden, Utah. Natalie Behring/Getty Images hide caption

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Natalie Behring/Getty Images

President Trump, with (from left) Vice President Pence, House Minority Whip Steve Scalise and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, addresses reporters in the Rose Garden of the White House about the government shutdown on Friday. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

The U.S. Capitol is seen Friday as the Senate worked on a House-passed bill that would pay for President Trump's border wall. After a procedural vote in the Senate, both chambers of Congress adjourned until midday Saturday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

If approved, the agreement would postpone the debate over money for President Trump's border wall until December, when a lame-duck Congress will be in place. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., leaves the Senate floor on Monday after the Senate passed a continuing resolution to fund the federal government. The House followed suit, and the government is expected to reopen on Tuesday. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Senate Minority Leader Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., speaks during a news conference on Saturday, arguing that the shutdown is mainly President Trump's fault. Republicans say Democrats manufactured the crisis over immigration. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

If Congress doesn't act to fund the Department of Homeland Security by Friday, then over 200,000 TSA employees won't be receiving paychecks — but many of them will still have to show up to work. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

For TSA Officers, Congress' Inaction On Funding Could Hit Home

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Members of the U.S. Park Service place barricades around the Lincoln Memorial on Tuesday in Washington, D.C. A partial shutdown of the federal government has led to the closing of national parks. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images