artisanal foods artisanal foods

A barista at El Injerto coffee shop in Guatemala City pours water into a chemex. Guatemala has long been known for its coffee, but a culture of artisanal coffee has only recently taken root here. Anna-Catherine Brigida hide caption

toggle caption
Anna-Catherine Brigida

Bartender Robin Miller mixes a round of mezcal margaritas at Espita Mezcaleria in Washington, D.C. As U.S. drinkers embrace mezcal, investors are flocking south to the heart of Mexico's mezcal country, and local incomes are rising. Kevin Leahy/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Kevin Leahy/NPR

America's Growing Taste For Mezcal Is Good For Mexico's Small Producers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/534752622/534835149" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Nancy Bruns, CEO of J.Q. Dickinson Salt-Works, gathers finished salt from an evaporation table in Malden, W.Va. Noah Adams for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Noah Adams for NPR

Fine Brine From Appalachia: The Fancy Mountain Salt That Chefs Prize

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/457371557/457415651" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Brent Gentry of Underground Meats rotates a coppa. Underground Meats is behind a new project that aims to lower the barrier to entry for would-be artisanal meat producers by making it easier for them to craft food safety plans. Emily Julka/Courtesy of Underground Meats hide caption

toggle caption
Emily Julka/Courtesy of Underground Meats