migrants migrants
Stories About

migrants

A U.S. Border Patrol agent processes a group of migrants in Sunland Park, New Mexico. Democratic lawmakers and immigrant advocates are urging President Biden to end Title 42 border restrictions. Paul Ratje/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Paul Ratje/AFP via Getty Images

A woman wearing the Ukrainian flag is handed a beverage at the train station in Przemysl, Poland, on Thursday. Ukrainians have been welcomed into Poland and other neighboring countries as they flee Russian attacks. Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Blend, a Kurd from Iraq, considers himself lucky. He has only spent 14 days in a camp on the Belarusian side of the border and five days in the woods after crossing to the Polish side. When his kidney problems started to become unbearable because of lack of food and water for the last days, and he couldn't walk longer, volunteers from Polish aid organizations arrived to help. Kasia Strek for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Kasia Strek for NPR

Migrants aiming to cross into Poland camp near the Bruzgi-Kuznica border crossing on the Belarusian-Polish border on Nov. 17. Maxim Guchek/BelTA/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Maxim Guchek/BelTA/AFP via Getty Images

Syrians say Belarus deported them even though they're wanted by Assad's regime

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1066806101/1067889632" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Haitian migrants boarding buses in Tapachula. Their encampment has been plagued with a lack of water, food and sanitation. Richard Tsong-Taatarii for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Richard Tsong-Taatarii for NPR

On Mexico's southern border, the latest migration surge is Haitian

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1065135970/1065502620" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A still from the 1961 Hindi film Kabuliwala, directed by Hemen Gupta. Kabuliwala (1961) hide caption

toggle caption
Kabuliwala (1961)

This 19th-century short story might help combat racism against refugees today

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1055752471/1062836009" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Migrants from Haiti get caught on a crevasse along the Acandiseco river, Colombia. Carlos Villalón for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Carlos Villalón for NPR

A once-remote patch of rainforest is now packed with migrants trying to reach the U.S.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1055936165/1056262412" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A man holding a child wipes his eye as the Kurdish family from Dohuk in Iraq waits for the border guard patrol, near Narewka, Poland, near the Polish-Belarusian border on Nov. 9. The three-generation family of 16 — with seven minors, including the youngest who is 5 months old — spent about 20 days in the forest and was pushed back to Belarus eight times. Wojtek Radwanski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Wojtek Radwanski/AFP via Getty Images

A United States Border Patrol agent on horseback tries to stop a Haitian migrant from entering an encampment on the banks of the Rio Grande near the Acuna Del Rio International Bridge in Del Rio, Texas on Sept. 19, 2021. Paul Ratje/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Paul Ratje/AFP via Getty Images

The inquiry into border agents on horseback continues. Critics see a 'broken' system

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1052786254/1055366749" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Fifty barracks are available for accommodation in the Krnjaca asylum center in Serbia, just outside the capital Belgrade. Single men live in separate housing, while families stay together. For those who decide to return home, the International Organization for Migration offers a "voluntary return and reintegration" program in the camp. Elisa Oddone hide caption

toggle caption
Elisa Oddone

A U.S. Border Patrol agent on horseback tries to stop a Haitian migrant from entering an encampment on the banks of the Rio Grande on Sunday near the international bridge in Del Rio, Texas. Paul Ratje/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Paul Ratje/AFP via Getty Images

U.S. Border Agents Chased Migrants On Horseback. A Photographer Explains What He Saw

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1039230310/1039230439" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott is one of a few GOP governors who say migrants are the source of rising COVID-19 rates. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Gay/AP

Some Republicans Blame Migrants For COVID-19 Surges. Doctors Say They're Scapegoating

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1026178171/1026409922" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A Cambodian migrant farm worker stands outside the greenhouse where she works growing vegetables in Miryang, South Korea. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Anthony Kuhn/NPR

As Workforce Ages, South Korea Increasingly Depends On Migrant Labor

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1001194446/1002112476" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

In this Dec. 9. 2019, file photo, residents in support of continued refugee resettlement hold signs at a meeting in Bismarck, N.D. James MacPherson/AP hide caption

toggle caption
James MacPherson/AP

'New Era In Resettlement': U.S. Refugee Advocates Count On More Community-Based Help

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/993153650/993164274" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Ajo, a former copper mining town more than 100 miles from Phoenix, is unincorporated. The U.S. government began dropping off migrants on the historic plaza in Ajo in March. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Kirk Siegler/NPR

Afghan Morteza Mohammadi (center-left) and his companions sit around a fire in the former Krajina Metal factory in Bihac, Bosnia-Herzegovina, near the Croatian border, discussing possible border crossing strategies related to the weather and time. Elisa Oddone hide caption

toggle caption
Elisa Oddone

A group of migrants rapidly deported from the U.S. under Title 42 wait on the Mexican side of the Paso del Norte International Bridge, between El Paso, Texas and Ciudad Juarez, Mexico on March 10. PAUL RATJE/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
PAUL RATJE/AFP via Getty Images

Rejected By 1 Mexican Port Of Entry, Migrants Are Flown By U.S. To Another

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/981190646/981809790" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Juan Gonzalez, shown here during a meeting last month at the White House, recently returned from a trip to Mexico and Guatemala. He's the National Security Council's senior director for the Western Hemisphere. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Evan Vucci/AP

'Predatory Elite' Also Bear The Blame For Migrant Crisis, NSC's Juan Gonzalez Says

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/981284187/981531670" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">