migrants migrants

A Myanmarese migrant and her child seek care at a refugee health clinic in Mae Sot, Thailand. Mae Sot, a town along the Thai-Myanmar border, is home to many Myanmarese migrants, some of whom are there illegally. Wudan Yan/for NPR hide caption

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Wudan Yan/for NPR

French President Francois Hollande (center right) shakes hands with Turkish Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu, (center left) before a meeting during an EU summit in Brussels on Friday. Stephane de Sakutin /AP hide caption

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Stephane de Sakutin /AP

Afghans seeking passports wait in line in Kabul on Jan. 20. Many Afghans are seeking to leave the country, though some have returned from countries like Germany after finding out that they were unlikely to receive asylum. Xinhua News Agency hide caption

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Xinhua News Agency

Feeling Unwanted In Germany, Some Afghan Migrants Head Home

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A migrant woman pictured in the northern Greek border station of Idomeni, on March 8. At least 14,000 people are stranded on the outskirts of the village as EU leaders try to control migrants entering Europe through the Balkan countries. Vadim Ghirda/AP hide caption

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Vadim Ghirda/AP

Asylum seekers from Afghanistan play football Feb. 7 in a resort in Halmstad, Sweden, where they are living temporarily. Sweden took in 163,000 migrants in 2015. Resistance to migrants is beginning to grow among some Swedes. David Ramos/Getty Images hide caption

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David Ramos/Getty Images

As Migrants Flow In, Sweden Begins To Rethink Its Open-Door Policy

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European Council President Donald Tusk (front center) shakes hands with Turkish Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu (front row, second from left) during a group photo at an EU summit Monday in Brussels. Francois Walschaerts/AP hide caption

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Francois Walschaerts/AP

Hans Sick and Freia-Mai Franck have taken in two Afghan teenagers. Franck, who came to Sweden as a German refugee after World War II, says, "I'm remembering what was happening to me when I was a child." Courtesy of Hans Sick and Freia-Mai Franck hide caption

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Courtesy of Hans Sick and Freia-Mai Franck

Fleeing Alone, Some Migrant Kids Find Foster Homes In Sweden

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Amran, an unaccompanied minor from Afghanistan, at right, walks in the camp known as the Jungle with 35-year-old Farid Hamdan, a father of four, also from Afghanistan. "My heart is saying help him because he's only a kid," says Hamdan. "He has nobody else here to look after him." There are 300 to 400 children staying in the Jungle. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

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Eleanor Beardsley/NPR

A Young Afghan Migrant Makes His Way In The Calais 'Jungle'

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Migrants and refugees seeking asylum in Sarstedt, Germany, line up Feb. 26 for lunch at the shelter where they live while their asylum applications are processed. Germany wants to send more migrants home and sent a charter plane filled with Afghan migrants back to Kabul on Wednesday. Alexander Koerner /Getty Images hide caption

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Alexander Koerner /Getty Images

Discouraged By Delays In Germany, Some Migrants Opt To Return Home

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At a makeshift burial ground in Samos, beyond the edges of a Greek Orthodox cemetery, lie the bodies of three Syrian children. The marker reads, "The child Noaman Tamim Shibly — For us Allah suffices, and he is the best disposer of affairs. To God we belong, and to him we shall return." Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

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Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Despite Aegean Rescuers' Best Efforts, Not All Migrants Are Saved

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Kent Norman, a retired Swedish engineer, is helping Syrian teenager Mohamed Obai with language study. "They're here now," he says, "so the only thing you can do is to help them." Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

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Eleanor Beardsley/NPR

In A Small Swedish Town, Residents Welcome Migrants

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The West Kensington Ministry church in Philadelphia, seen here in 2014, is one of about a dozen churches offering sanctuary to Central American immigrants who are under deportation orders. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

U.S. Churches Offer Safe Haven For A New Generation Of Immigrants

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