grains grains
Stories About

grains

A bowl of Honey Toasted Kernza. General Mills made 6,000 boxes of the cereal and is passing them out to spread the word about perennial grains. Olivia Sun/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Olivia Sun/NPR

Can This Breakfast Cereal Help Save The Planet?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/711144729/712997100" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Bob Moore, founder of Bob's Red Mill Natural Foods, inspects grains at the company's facility in Milwaukie, Ore. The pioneering manufacturer of gluten-free products invests in whole grains as well as beans, seeds, nuts, dried fruits, spices and herbs. Natalie Behring/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Natalie Behring/Bloomberg via Getty Images

When Corsair Distillery in Nashville, Tenn., wanted to start experimenting with alternative grains, there wasn't a playbook to follow. Now, it makes a quinoa-barley whiskey. Ashlie Stevens/WFPL hide caption

toggle caption
Ashlie Stevens/WFPL

This granary weevil has set up shop inside a kernel. Even without wings, these stealthy stowaways — with the help of humans — have managed to infest grains all over the world for thousands of years. Biophoto Associates/Getty Images/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
Biophoto Associates/Getty Images/Science Source

Scientists find that rice grown under elevated carbon conditions loses substantial amounts of protein, zinc, iron and B vitamins, depending on the variety. Maximilian Stock, Ltd./Getty Images/Passage hide caption

toggle caption
Maximilian Stock, Ltd./Getty Images/Passage

A head of poor-quality malt barley taken directly from a field in Power, Mont. Heat and a lack of water resulted in small and light kernels. Grain rejected for malt barley often ends up as animal feed. Tony Bynum/Food & Environment Reporting Network hide caption

toggle caption
Tony Bynum/Food & Environment Reporting Network

Green tips of of a newly developed grain called Salish Blue are poking through older, dead stalks in Washington's Skagit Valley. Eilís O'Neill/KUOW/EarthFix hide caption

toggle caption
Eilís O'Neill/KUOW/EarthFix

Food writer Maria Speck soaks bulgur wheat in pomegranate juice to saturate it with burgundy color, then serves it with blueberries and orange-blossom water to tantalize the taste buds and eyes. Penguin/Random House hide caption

toggle caption
Penguin/Random House

In a village outside of Jenin, in the West Bank, Palestinian farmers harvest wheat early and burn the husks to yield the smoky, nutty grain known as freekeh. Daniella Cheslow for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Daniella Cheslow for NPR

A test field of sorghum outside Manhattan, Kan., planted by Kansas State University. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Dan Charles/NPR

Heat, Drought Draw Farmers Back To Sorghum, The 'Camel Of Crops'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/231509864/242150647" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript