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A piglet gets a shot of antibiotic at a farm in Illinois. The World Health Organization is calling for strict limits on antibiotic use in animals raised for food. The guidelines could push many countries, including the U.S., to restrict drug use on farms. Stacey Wescott/Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Stacey Wescott/Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images

Chipotle restaurant workers fill orders for customers. The company is now sourcing some of its pork from a British supplier that uses antibiotics to treat pigs when ill. Gail Hansen, a veterinarian and longtime critic of antibiotic overuse on farms, welcomes this shift in Chipotle's stance on the drugs. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Why Chipotle's Hard Line On Swine Antibiotics Is Now Blurry

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Tyson Foods says it has already reduced its use of human-use antibiotics by 80 percent over the past four years. Here, Tyson frozen chicken on display at Piazza's market in Palo Alto, Calif., in 2010. Paul Sakuma/AP hide caption

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Paul Sakuma/AP

Tyson Foods To Stop Giving Chickens Antibiotics Used By Humans

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An order of McDonald's Chicken McNuggets in Olmsted Falls, Ohio. McDonald's says it plans to start using chicken raised without antibiotics important to human medicine. Mark Duncan/AP hide caption

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Mark Duncan/AP

Chicks in the Perdue hatchery in Salisbury, Md. The company says an increasing number of its chickens are now raised using "no antibiotics, ever." Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Perdue Says Its Hatching Chicks Are Off Antibiotics

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Young broilers nibble feed at a chicken farm in Luling, Texas. The Food and Drug Administration has issued new guidance on how drug companies label antibiotics for livestock. Bob Nichols/USDA/Flickr hide caption

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Bob Nichols/USDA/Flickr

Drug Companies Accept FDA Plan To Phase Out Some Animal Antibiotic Uses

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Turkeys sit in a barn in Sonoma, Calif. An estimated 46 million turkeys are cooked and eaten during Thanksgiving meals in the U.S. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

In recent years, pork producers have found ways to keep the animals healthy through improved hygiene. M. Spencer Green/AP hide caption

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M. Spencer Green/AP

Why Are Pig Farmers Still Using Growth-Promoting Drugs?

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Cattle crowd inside a feedlot operated by JBS Five Rivers Colorado Beef in Wiley, Colo. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Are Farm Veterinarians Pushing Too Many Antibiotics?

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Piglets in a pen on a hog farm in Frankenstein, Mo. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

Antibiotic Use On The Farm: Are We Flying Blind?

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