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A man looks at an electronic stock indicator of a securities firm in Tokyo, on Tuesday. Shares tumbled in Asia on Tuesday after a wild day for U.S. markets that resulted in the biggest drop in the Dow Jones industrial average in six and a half years. Shizuo Kambayashi/AP hide caption

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Shizuo Kambayashi/AP

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange last week. With its new record level, the blue chip index is now up 16 percent since the start of the year and about 26 percent since Election Day. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange in New York on Jan. 4. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

Analysts: Markets May Be Underestimating U.S. Economic Resilience

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A sign promotes a real estate project last month in Kunming, China. Construction of residential and commercial properties has outpaced demand in China, a factor that some analysts cite in forecasting another global economic downturn. Zhang Peng/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Zhang Peng/LightRocket via Getty Images

A trading hall sits empty in a securities firm in Haikou, China, Monday. Trading on the Shanghai and Shenzhen stock markets was ended before 2 p.m. Monday after shares tumbled 7 percent. Zhao Yingquan/Xinhua /Landov hide caption

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Zhao Yingquan/Xinhua /Landov

Prices for both gasoline and natural gas have fallen this year. An AT&T employee fills up his company van in San Diego last month. Mike Blake/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Mike Blake/Reuters/Landov

As the Nasdaq closes above the record set 15 years ago, stock analysts are debating whether the market is approaching another bubble. Bryan Thomas/Getty Images hide caption

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Bryan Thomas/Getty Images

15 Years After The Dot-Com Bust, A Nasdaq Record

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