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People walk past an Apple store in Beijing in December 2018. Apple CEO cited weaker-than-expected iPhone sales in China as the company lowered its quarterly revenue estimates Wednesday. Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images

With the Dow swinging up and down hundreds of points in a day, investors are feeling queasy. One economist says uncertainty in the stock markets may mean turbulence will continue in the new year. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Stock Market Gyrations Making You Dizzy? Get Used To It, Analysts Say

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People look at cars at a Tesla showroom in New York City. Tesla CEO Elon Musk, reportedly under scrutiny by federal regulators for earlier statements, says Saudi Arabia's sovereign wealth fund is looking to diversify away from oil with a bigger investment in the electric car company. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Tesla Motors CEO Elon Musk is considering taking the company private, saying it would be less distracting that the "enormous pressure" of meeting quarterly financial targets. Stephen Lam/Reuters hide caption

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Stephen Lam/Reuters

8 Years After Going Public, Elon Musk Wants To Take Tesla Private

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Apple, the world's most valuable publicly traded company, became the first to reach the milestone $1 trillion market value. Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images

Apple Becomes World's 1st Private-Sector Company Worth $1 Trillion

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Trader Tommy Kalikas works Monday on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Major stock indexes fell sharply, led by tech stocks, amid fears of an intensifying U.S. trade war with China. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

The Nasdaq composite index, which includes many tech stocks, has lost nearly 7 percent since March 12. Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images

Tech Stocks Have Lost Some Of Their Luster, Dragging The Stock Market Lower

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Carl Icahn quit his job as a special adviser to the president in August of last year, hours before an article about the conflicts of interest created by his advisory role published in The New Yorker. CNBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images hide caption

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CNBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images

A man looks at an electronic stock indicator of a securities firm in Tokyo, on Tuesday. Shares tumbled in Asia on Tuesday after a wild day for U.S. markets that resulted in the biggest drop in the Dow Jones industrial average in six and a half years. Shizuo Kambayashi/AP hide caption

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Shizuo Kambayashi/AP

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange last week. With its new record level, the blue chip index is now up 16 percent since the start of the year and about 26 percent since Election Day. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange in New York on Jan. 4. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

Analysts: Markets May Be Underestimating U.S. Economic Resilience

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A sign promotes a real estate project last month in Kunming, China. Construction of residential and commercial properties has outpaced demand in China, a factor that some analysts cite in forecasting another global economic downturn. Zhang Peng/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Zhang Peng/LightRocket via Getty Images

A trading hall sits empty in a securities firm in Haikou, China, Monday. Trading on the Shanghai and Shenzhen stock markets was ended before 2 p.m. Monday after shares tumbled 7 percent. Zhao Yingquan/Xinhua /Landov hide caption

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Zhao Yingquan/Xinhua /Landov

Prices for both gasoline and natural gas have fallen this year. An AT&T employee fills up his company van in San Diego last month. Mike Blake/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Mike Blake/Reuters/Landov

As the Nasdaq closes above the record set 15 years ago, stock analysts are debating whether the market is approaching another bubble. Bryan Thomas/Getty Images hide caption

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Bryan Thomas/Getty Images

15 Years After The Dot-Com Bust, A Nasdaq Record

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