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Swapping out some basic supplies can help you explore eco-friendly cleaning. Swedish dishcloths, reusable cloths, detergent sheets, hand soap tablets and reusable bottles for mixing your own solutions are good building blocks for a green cleaning routine. Photo Illustration by Becky Harlan/NPR hide caption

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Photo Illustration by Becky Harlan/NPR

Start cleaning your home more sustainably with these tips

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"It used to be a backyard. Now it's a summer oasis," says Astoria Camille of the water feature she built in her mother's Kansas City, Mo., backyard using an old stock tank and 53 bags of pea gravel. Frank Morris/KCUR hide caption

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Frank Morris/KCUR

The bathroom at the Glasscock house in Pensacola, Fla., where mother and daughter attempted to install a bidet. Megan Glasscock hide caption

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Megan Glasscock

DIY During Quarantine. What Could Possibly Go Wrong? Plenty

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Doug Bergeson lies on a hospital bed at Aurora BayCare Medical Center in Green Bay, Wis., on June 25, before a doctor removed a nail from his heart. Bergeson had accidentally shot it into his heart earlier in the day while working on a new house in Peshtigo, Wis. He survived. Donna Bergeson/AP hide caption

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Donna Bergeson/AP

A DIYgirls team from San Fernando Senior High School created a device that uses solar power to sanitize a tent using antibacterial UV lights. Courtesy of DIYGirls hide caption

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Courtesy of DIYGirls

All-Girls Teen Engineering Team Creates A Solar-Powered Tent For Homeless People

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Luis Alberto de la Rosa says he sells lots of misoprostol, a drug used in abortions and in ulcer treatment, to women from Texas who come to his Miramar Pharmacy in Nuevo Progreso, Mexico. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

Legal Medical Abortions Are Up In Texas, But So Are DIY Pills From Mexico

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