workers workers
Stories About

workers

A pedestrian walks by REI's flagship store in New York, where last year workers formed the company's first union. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

REI fostered a progressive reputation. Then its workers began to unionize

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1186006322/1186030002" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Trey Ditto, CEO of Ditto PR, said making salary ranges transparent was a rollercoaster ride, but ultimately very productive for his company. Ditto PR hide caption

toggle caption
Ditto PR

The big reveal: New laws require companies to disclose pay ranges on job postings.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1134193927/1147249919" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

David Williams is a stocker at a Dollar General store in New Orleans. He's pushing for better work conditions and pay at his store with help from Step Up Louisiana. Stephan Bisaha/Gulf States Newsroom hide caption

toggle caption
Stephan Bisaha/Gulf States Newsroom

Dollar store workers in the South have a labor movement. Just don't call it a union

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1120473763/1120917872" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

FILE - The Apple logo adorns the facade of a retail store. More than 100 employees of an Apple store in a suburb of Baltimore voted to unionize by a nearly 2-to-1 margin Saturday, June 18, 2022. Kathy Willens/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Kathy Willens/AP

A Trader Joe's in Hadley, Mass., has filed for a union election and would become the first unionized store in the chain if successful. Jeenah Moon/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jeenah Moon/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Alabama coal miners rally at a local ballpark in Brookwood. They've been on strike against Warrior Met Coal since April 1. Stephan Bisaha/Gulf States Newsroom hide caption

toggle caption
Stephan Bisaha/Gulf States Newsroom

Unions have enthusiasm, media spotlight. But membership numbers lag

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1075803876/1076323307" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A droplet falls from a syringe after a health care worker was injected with the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine last year at a hospital in Providence, R.I. David Goldman/AP hide caption

toggle caption
David Goldman/AP

Air traffic controllers walk the picket line at the airport during strike on August 15, 1981. Dennis Caruso/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Dennis Caruso/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images

A server delivers food to customers dining at a restaurant in Los Angeles on Aug. 7. Restaurants are boosting pay to attract workers, and that could have an impact on already-high inflation. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

Wages Are Going Up — And So Is Inflation. Consumer Prices Have Hit A 13-Year High

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1026493316/1026567073" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Armando Negron and Bellaliz Gonzalez were recovery workers in Midland, Mich., after two dam collapses flooded the area. Armando Negron and Bellaliz Gonzalez hide caption

toggle caption
Armando Negron and Bellaliz Gonzalez

'We Were Treated Worse Than Animals': Disaster Recovery Workers Confront COVID-19

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/888962560/889308057" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This weekend, temporary pay bumps for workers during the coronavirus pandemic are ending at companies across the country. In a normal world, high hazard pay might be the only way to stop employees from quitting en masse. But with tens of millions unemployed, workers quickly lost a lot of leverage. Ada Yokota/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ada Yokota/Getty Images

As 'Hero' Pay Ends, Essential Workers Wonder What They Are Worth

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/864477016/865345490" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A Senegalese migrant collects oranges on the plain of Rosarno and San Ferdinando in Calabria, Italy, on Feb. 6. The lockdown countries imposed to stop the coronavirus pandemic have cut off the usual flow of seasonal farmworkers. Alfonso Di Vicenzo/LightRocket via Getty hide caption

toggle caption
Alfonso Di Vicenzo/LightRocket via Getty

Italy Considers Permits For Undocumented Migrants To Fill A Big Farmworker Gap

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/847483140/847842202" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A "closed" sign is posted at the entrance of a New York State Department of Labor office in Brooklyn. With millions of people filing for unemployment benefits, state employment agencies have been overwhelmed around the country. Andrew Kelly/Reuters hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Kelly/Reuters

Lunch clubs are becoming a popular trend in offices as a way for co-workers to brighten each other's days by sharing meals they've prepared for one another. They might eat together or at their own separate desks. Ella Olsson/Flickr Creative Commons hide caption

toggle caption
Ella Olsson/Flickr Creative Commons

Will Lambek, left, interprets for Enrique Balcazar, a Migrant Justice activist who helped negotiate the fair labor and living standards agreement with Ben & Jerry's. John Dillon/Vermont Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption
John Dillon/Vermont Public Radio

The family-owned Wholesum Harvest had to meet a checklist of more than 300 standards — including many worker protections — to become the first American farm certified by Fair Trade USA. Workers at its Nogales, Ariz., tomato farm recently received a check for more than $30,000 — workers will collectively decide how to spend it. Courtesy of Wholesum Harvest hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Wholesum Harvest