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In a June 22 World Cup Match in St. Petersburg, Russia, Costa Rica's Giancarlo Gonzalez fouls Brazil's Neymar (in blue at left), but the penalty was rescinded after Video Assistant Referee review. Brazil went on to win 2-0. Lee Smith/Reuters hide caption

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Lee Smith/Reuters

Has Video Refereeing Ruined The World Cup?

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Belgium goalkeeper Thibaut Courtois, left, is beaten by a header from France's Samuel Umtiti for the opening goal during the semifinal match between France and Belgium at the 2018 soccer World Cup in St. Petersburg, Russia on Tuesday. Martin Meissner/AP hide caption

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Martin Meissner/AP

A raucous crowd cheers for Team USA during a Tuesday, July 1, 2014 World Cup soccer match between the U.S. and Belgium at a public viewing party in Detroit, Tuesday, July 1, 2014. For many fans during next year's U.S.-free World Cup, it'll be just another day in the office. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP

Trinidad and Tobago's Alvin Jones (17) celebrates after scoring against the U.S. Tuesday, in a game that served as revenge for his team's 1989 loss to the Americans. The U.S. men are eliminated from the 2018 World Cup. Rebecca Blackwell/AP hide caption

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Rebecca Blackwell/AP

'Revenge,' Shock And Rage, After U.S. Men's Team Whiffs On World Cup

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Team USA's Christian Pulisic is defended by Trinidad and Tobago's Kevon Villaroel on Tuesday night during their 2018 World Cup qualifier football match in Couva, Trinidad and Tobago. A loss, combined with other results, means the U.S. team will be staying home next year. Luis Acosta/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Luis Acosta/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. men's national soccer team coach Bruce Arena watches his team during a practice session on Jan. 11, in Carson, Calif. Arena returned to the U.S. team in November to salvage its run for World Cup qualification. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

U.S. Men's Soccer Goes Back To The Future With New Coach, New Priorities

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FIFA President Sepp Blatter (right), seen here with UEFA President Michel Platini after he was re-elected in May, says Platini's European federation has sought to undermine him. Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images

In this photo taken May 3 during a government-organized media tour, Kuttamon Chembadnan Velayi from Kerala, India, speaks to journalists while sitting on his bed in a room he shares with seven other Indian laborers in Doha, Qatar. The housing facility has been cited by Qatari labor officials for substandard conditions. Maya Alleruzzo/AP hide caption

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Maya Alleruzzo/AP

Bhutanese football player Chencho Gyeltshen controls the ball in a March 5 match against Sri Lanka. The striker hit two goals Tuesday to lead Bhutan past Sri Lanka and into the next phase of World Cup Qualifying. Lakruwan Wanniarachchi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Lakruwan Wanniarachchi/AFP/Getty Images

An artist's impression of the Qatar Foundation Stadium, one of the venues for the 2022 World Cup in Qatar. A FIFA task force recommended today that soccer's showcase tournament be played from late November to the end of December. AP hide caption

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AP

FIFA President Sepp Blatter told a news conference in Colombo, Sri Lanka, on Tuesday that FIFA wasn't responsible for the working conditions of laborers who are building the stadiums for the 2022 World Cup in Qatar. He said the companies that employed the migrant workers should be responsible for their safety. M.A. Pushpa Kumara /EPA /LANDOV hide caption

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M.A. Pushpa Kumara /EPA /LANDOV

FIFA President Joseph Blatter is flanked by Russian Deputy Prime Minister Igor Shuvalov (right) and Qatari Emir Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa Al-Thani on Dec. 2, 2010, in Zurich, Switzerland, after the announcement that Russia will host the 2018 World Cup and Qatar in 2022. Michael Probst/AP hide caption

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Michael Probst/AP

FIFA President Joseph Blatter (second right) is flanked in Zurich, Switzerland, on Dec. 2, 2010, by Russian Deputy Prime Minister Igor Shuvalov (right) and Qatar's Emir Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa Al-Thani after the announcement that Russia will host the soccer World Cup in 2018 and Qatar in 2022. Michael Probst/AP hide caption

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Michael Probst/AP

FIFA President Sepp Blatter and Qatar Football Association President Sheikh Hamad Bin Khalifa Bin Ahmed al-Thani exchange documents in Doha, Qatar, on Dec. 16, 2010, after the Arab country won the bid to stage the 2022 FIFA World Cup. Osama Faisal/AP hide caption

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Osama Faisal/AP