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T-Mobile and Sprint stores in El Cerrito, Calif. The Department of Justice approved the $26 billion merger of the two wireless carriers. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

T-Mobile And Sprint Merger Finally Wins Justice Department's Blessing

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Huawei Chairman Liang Hua, shown in 2018, said Tuesday that Huawei is willing to sign a "no-spy agreement" to reassure U.S. leaders who worry the company's technology could be used for surveillance. VCG via Getty Images hide caption

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VCG via Getty Images

Huawei Chairman Willing To Sign A 'No-Spy' Deal With The United States

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A crew hangs a Huawei advertising banner on the side of the Las Vegas Convention Center in January. Some senators want to ban it the world's third-largest seller of smartphones from the U.S. Steve Marcus/Reuters hide caption

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Steve Marcus/Reuters

Under the USA Freedom Act, phone call metadata will remain with private phone carriers but can be subpoenaed by the government. Alex Williamson/Ikon Images/Corbis hide caption

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Alex Williamson/Ikon Images/Corbis

Phone Carriers Tight-Lipped On How They Will Comply With New Surveillance Law

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Randall Stephenson, chairman and CEO of AT&T, introduces President Obama before the latter's remarks Dec. 3 at the quarterly meeting of the Business Roundtable, a group Stephenson chairs. Stephenson has said that increasing regulation of the broadband industry — as proposed by the president — would have a substantial chilling effect on its investment in infrastructure. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Would FCC Plan Harm Telecom Investment? Even Industry Opinion Is Mixed

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A lineman grounds a line on a replacement pole in McNeill, Miss., after 2012 Christmas day storms downed both telephone and electric power lines and poles throughout the state. Upkeep on traditional landlines is expensive, and some are pushing for relaxing requirements that phone companies maintain these lines. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP