sign language sign language

Rima Prajapati with daughters (from left) Jhoti, Aarti and Sangeeta. Jhoti and Aarti were both born deaf. Rima moved her daughters from their village to Mumbai so they could attend a school for the deaf. Kate Petcosky-Kulkarni for NPR hide caption

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Kate Petcosky-Kulkarni for NPR

Todd Haynes On 'Wonderstruck,' And Evolution Of Deaf Culture In The U.S.

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Koko, seen here with Penny Patterson (left) at age 4 1/2 — nearly 40 years ago — was taught sign language. June Monroe, an interpreter for the deaf at St. Luke's Church who helped teach Koko, is in the center. Bettmann Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Bettmann Archive/Getty Images

SignAloud gloves translate sign language into text and speech. Conrado Tapado/Univ of Washington, CoMotion hide caption

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Conrado Tapado/Univ of Washington, CoMotion

These Gloves Offer A Modern Twist On Sign Language

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President Barack Obama speaks at Nelson Mandela's memorial service in Johannesburg. Standing to his right, Thamsanqa Jantjie gestures as if he is interpreting the speech for the deaf community. Alexander Joe/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Alexander Joe/AFP/Getty Images

As President Obama and other world leaders spoke Tuesday in Johannesburg at a memorial for Nelson Mandela, a man stood nearby and appeared to be doing sign language interpretation. Many in the deaf community are outraged because the man appeared to be faking. Pedro Ugarte /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Pedro Ugarte /AFP/Getty Images