Bertha the tunneling machine Bertha the tunneling machine

Workers prepare a gravel pad as a massive crane is used to lift a 2,000-ton section of the tunnel boring machine known as "Bertha" in March 2015. The project was stalled for two years as engineers struggled to repair the gigantic machine. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Bertha Finally Breaks Through In Seattle

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Bertha, The Giant Borer That Broke, May Be Sinking Seattle's Downtown

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In this photo made with a fish-eye wide-angle lens, Bertha, the massive boring machine that is drilling a two-mile tunnel under Seattle, is shown in July before work began. The tunnel will replace a double deck highway along the downtown Seattle waterfront. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP