ocean pollution ocean pollution

Microplastics found along Lake Ontario by Rochman's team Chris Joyce/NPR hide caption

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Chris Joyce/NPR

Beer, Drinking Water And Fish: Tiny Plastic Is Everywhere

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Some 80 plastic bags extracted from within a whale are being laid out in Songkhla, Thailand, in this still image captured from video footage. Thailand's Department of Marine and Coastal Resources/Social Media/via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS hide caption

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Thailand's Department of Marine and Coastal Resources/Social Media/via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS

As awareness grows about the environmental toll of single-use plastics, retailers and regulators alike are finding ways to decrease their use. And straws have become a prime target. Barbara Woike/AP hide caption

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Barbara Woike/AP

Last Straw For Plastic Straws? Cities, Restaurants Move To Toss These Sippers

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Oysters, shown out of their shell, collect tiny plastic particles while in the water. These microplastics can eventually make their way into your dinner. Ken Christensen/KCTS Television hide caption

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Ken Christensen/KCTS Television

Henderson Island, in the South Pacific, is thousands of miles from any major industrial centers or human communities. But it's filled with trash — more than 37 million pieces of it, researchers say. Jennifer Lavers/University of Tasmania hide caption

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Jennifer Lavers/University of Tasmania

Tiny, shrimplike amphipods living in the Mariana Trench were contaminated at levels similar to those found in crabs living in waters fed by one of China's most polluted rivers. Dr. Alan Jamieson/Newcastle University hide caption

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Dr. Alan Jamieson/Newcastle University

Pollution Has Worked Its Way Down To The World's Deepest Waters

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Oceans Called A 'Wild West' Where Lawlessness And Impunity Rule

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"A lot of people are eating seafood all the time, and fish are eating plastic all the time, so I think that's a problem," says a marine toxicologist. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto