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NFL Concussion

Mo Better Jaguars' coaches and players huddle at the end of practice at Betsy Head Park in Brownsville, Brooklyn in September 2014. Courtesy of Albert Samaha hide caption

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Courtesy of Albert Samaha

Poor Students More Likely To Play Football, Despite Brain Injury Concerns

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Minnesota Vikings players bring down Washington wide receiver Art Monk during an NFL game in 1992. Monk was one of the lead plaintiffs in the $1 billion settlement with the NFL over brain injuries among former players. Doug Mills/AP hide caption

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Doug Mills/AP

Kevin Turner was a lead plaintiff in the class-action lawsuit against the NFL that was affirmed Monday. Turner died last month; he's seen here in a 2014 Senate hearing on the long-term effects of brain injuries. Charles Dharapak/AP hide caption

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Charles Dharapak/AP

Dr. Bennet Omalu speaks on stage during the 2015 Health Hero Awards hosted by WebMD on Nov. 5 in New York City. Bryan Bedder/Getty Images hide caption

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Bryan Bedder/Getty Images

Doctor Behind 'Concussion' Wanted To 'Enhance The Lives' Of Football Players

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High school athlete Graham Hill, number 50, suffered a concussion in 2013 while playing football at Trinity Christian Academy in Addison, Texas. Courtesy of Jeffrey McWhorter hide caption

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Courtesy of Jeffrey McWhorter

High Schools Seek A Safer Path Back From Concussion

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Making and taking a hit chest to chest, instead of skull to skull, is easier to remember if you're not wearing a helmet, say University of New Hampshire Wildcat football players. Jack Rodolico/New Hampshire Public Radio hide caption

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Jack Rodolico/New Hampshire Public Radio

Football Players Drill Without Helmets To Curb Concussions

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Junior Seau sustained many concussions during his career and was suffering from a degenerative brain disease when he killed himself in May 2012. Otto Greule Jr./Getty Images hide caption

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Otto Greule Jr./Getty Images