Dinesh D'Souza Dinesh D'Souza
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Dinesh D'Souza

Fences surround the Maricopa County Tabulation and Elections Center (MCTEC) in Phoenix, Arizona, on Oct. 25, 2022, to help prevent incidents and pressure on voters at the ballot drop box. Olivier Touron/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Touron/AFP via Getty Images

How documentary-style films turn conspiracy theories into a call to action

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In August, the conservative publisher Regnery abruptly recalled Dinesh D'Souza's election denial book 2,000 Mules from stores citing an unspecified "publishing error." NPR compared the recalled version of the book with the version that Regnery published this week. Willy Sanjuan/AP hide caption

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Willy Sanjuan/AP

Catherine Engelbrecht, seen here in 2015, founded the controversial nonprofit True the Vote. A new lawsuit alleges that Engelbrecht and True the Vote defamed a small company that makes software for election workers. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Prominent election deniers are facing growing legal trouble

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The book version of "2,000 Mules," the latest project from author and filmmaker Dinesh D'Souza, was abruptly recalled due to an unspecified "error." John Raoux/AP hide caption

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John Raoux/AP

A publisher abruptly recalled the '2000 Mules' election denial book. NPR got a copy.

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Dinesh D'Souza, seen here at a premiere of one of his films in 2018, has released a new film alleging voter fraud in the 2020 presidential election. Fact checkers have cast doubt on many of the film's claims. Shannon Finney/Getty Images hide caption

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Shannon Finney/Getty Images

A pro-Trump film suggests its data are so accurate, it solved a murder. That's false

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Cynthia Hughes, seen here wearing a "Due Process Denied" shirt, has become a regular on Steve Bannon's show, where she has described the Jan. 6 defendants as "political prisoners." On a recent episode, Hughes announced changes to the Patriot Freedom Project after receiving criticism. War Room/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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War Room/Screenshot by NPR

Conservative filmmaker and author Dinesh D'Souza speaks during the final day of the 2014 Republican Leadership Conference on May 31 of that year in New Orleans. Earlier that month, he had pleaded guilty to campaign finance fraud. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images