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A California two-spot octopus extends a sucker-lined arm from its den. In 2015, this was the first octopus species to have its full genetic sequence published. Courtesy of Michael LaBarbera hide caption

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Courtesy of Michael LaBarbera

Why Octopuses Might Be The Next Lab Rats

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UCLA researchers are using a radioactive tracer, which binds to abnormal proteins in the brain, to see if it is possible to diagnose chronic traumatic encephalopathy in living patients. Warmer colors in these PET scans indicate higher concentrations of the tracer. UCLA hide caption

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UCLA

Scientists placed two clusters of cultured forebrain cells side by side (each cluster the size of a head of a pin). Within days, the "minibrains" had fused and particular neurons (in green) migrated from the left side to the right side, as subsets of cells do in a real brain. Courtesy of Pasca lab/Stanford University hide caption

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Courtesy of Pasca lab/Stanford University

'Minibrains' In A Dish Shed A Little Light On Autism And Epilepsy

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This image is from lab-grown brain tissue — a minibrain — infected by Zika virus (white) with neural stem cells in red and neuronal nuclei in green. Courtesy of Xuyu Qian and Guo-li Ming hide caption

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Courtesy of Xuyu Qian and Guo-li Ming

'Minibrains' Could Help Drug Discovery For Zika And For Alzheimer's

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A relaxed, undrugged dog patiently waits its turn in the MRI scanner. The scientists' trick: Make it seem fun. Enikő Kubinyi/Science hide caption

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Enikő Kubinyi/Science

How A Dog In An MRI Scanner Is Like Your Grandma At A Disco

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Experimental drugs that clear clumps of proteins from the brains of Alzheimer's patients haven't panned out yet. Science Photo Library/Pasieka/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Library/Pasieka/Getty Images

Test Of Experimental Alzheimer's Drug Finds Progress Against Brain Plaques

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Scientists with the international scientific collaboration known as the "Walk Again Project" use noninvasive brain-machine interfaces in their efforts to reawaken damaged fibers in the spinal cord. AASDAP and Lente Viva Filmes, São Paulo, Brazil/Nature hide caption

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AASDAP and Lente Viva Filmes, São Paulo, Brazil/Nature

Researchers have long known that exercise is good for the brain. An enzyme produced by muscles might help explain why. Monalyn Gracia/Corbis/VCG/Getty Images hide caption

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Monalyn Gracia/Corbis/VCG/Getty Images

A Protein That Moves From Muscle To Brain May Tie Exercise To Memory

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Neuroscientist Takashi Kitamura works in the lab of Nobel laureate Susumu Tonegawa at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. One of their recent projects helped identify a brain circuit involved in processing the "where" and "when" of memory. "Ocean cells" (red) and "island cells" (blue) play key roles. Takashi Kitamura/MIT hide caption

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Takashi Kitamura/MIT

30,000 Brain Researchers Meld Minds At Science's Hottest Hangout

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Women make up nearly two-thirds of the people in the U.S. diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Gene Linked To Alzheimer's Poses A Special Threat To Women

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