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The first Alaska Airlines passenger flight on a Boeing 737-9 Max airplane takes off on a flight to San Diego from Seattle-Tacoma International Airport in Seattle on March 1, 2021. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

FAA orders grounding of certain Boeing 737 Max 9 planes after Alaska Airlines incident

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An airline worker died on Saturday after being "ingested" into the engine of American Airlines Embraer aircraft, like the kind pictured here at the Dallas/Fort Worth International airport in Dallas in June 2021. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Air passengers heading to their departure gates enter TSA PreCheck at Orlando International Airport. Access to PreCheck could now be revoked for unruly passengers. John Raoux/AP hide caption

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John Raoux/AP

The Federal Aviation Administration must fix oversight weaknesses found following the Boeing 737 Max crashes, according to a new report from the Transportation Department's inspector general. Valery Hache/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Valery Hache/AFP via Getty Images

On October 30, 1935, a Boeing plane known as the "flying fortress" crashed during a military demonstration in Ohio — shocking the aviation industry and prompting questions about the future of flight. National Archives hide caption

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National Archives

The Federal Aviation Administration is refusing to regulate the size of airline seats, saying it sees no evidence that filling smaller seats with bigger passengers slows emergency evacuations. NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Tired Of Tiny Seats And No Legroom On Flights? Don't Expect It To Change

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Employees check a Sichuan Airlines Airbus A-319 on Monday after an emergency landing in Chengdu in China's northwestern Sichuan province. A cockpit window that broke midflight has been covered up; the flight's co-pilot was partially sucked out of the window. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

On October 30, 1935, a Boeing plane known as the "flying fortress" crashed during a military demonstration in Ohio — shocking the aviation industry and prompting questions about the future of flight. National Archives hide caption

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National Archives

The Trick To Surviving A High-Stakes, High-Pressure Job? Try A Checklist

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