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On October 30, 1935, a Boeing plane known as the "flying fortress" crashed during a military demonstration in Ohio — shocking the aviation industry and prompting questions about the future of flight. National Archives hide caption

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National Archives

The Federal Aviation Administration is refusing to regulate the size of airline seats, saying it sees no evidence that filling smaller seats with bigger passengers slows emergency evacuations. NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Tired Of Tiny Seats And No Legroom On Flights? Don't Expect It To Change

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Employees check a Sichuan Airlines Airbus A-319 on Monday after an emergency landing in Chengdu in China's northwestern Sichuan province. A cockpit window that broke midflight has been covered up; the flight's co-pilot was partially sucked out of the window. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

On October 30, 1935, a Boeing plane known as the "flying fortress" crashed during a military demonstration in Ohio — shocking the aviation industry and prompting questions about the future of flight. National Archives hide caption

toggle caption
National Archives

The Trick To Surviving A High-Stakes, High-Pressure Job? Try A Checklist

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