Birmingham, Ala. Birmingham, Ala.
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Birmingham, Ala.

Christopher McNair, center left, and Maxine McNair, right, parents of Denise McNair, one of four African American girls who died in a church bombing in Birmingham, Ala., on Sept. 15, 1963, are shown here at a news conference in New York later that month. Maxine McNair, the last living parent of any of the children killed in the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church, died on Sunday at 93. AP hide caption

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AP

Bombing victim Sarah Collins Rudolph, pictured in 2013, argues that Ku Klux Klan members who attacked the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Ala., in 1963 were "inspired and motivated by then-Gov. [George] Wallace's racist rhetoric." Dave Martin/AP hide caption

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Dave Martin/AP

Dozens of fans turned out to watch the Red Sox amateur baseball team tangle with the Yankees at Regions Field in Birmingham, Ala. The teams are part of an over-35 league showcasing their skills at a ballpark normally used by the Birmingham Barons minor league baseball team. Russell Lewis/NPR hide caption

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Russell Lewis/NPR

Baseball-Starved Fans Turn Out To Watch Middle-Aged Men Play

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The Confederate Soldiers and Sailors Monument in Birmingham, Ala., seen here in 2016, has been the subject of legal controversy in recent years. Jay Reeves/AP hide caption

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Jay Reeves/AP

State representatives work in the house chambers at the State House in Montgomery, Ala. A federal appeals court sided with workers from Birmingham, Ala., who argued that state lawmakers racially discriminated against the majority-black city by blocking a minimum wage hike. Brynn Anderson/AP hide caption

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Brynn Anderson/AP

In Battle Pitting Cities Vs. States Over Minimum Wage, Birmingham Scores A Win

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