LGBTQ issues LGBTQ issues

Phoenix residents Laurie Provost (left), 53, and Maddie Adelman, 50, have watched their city become increasingly welcoming toward the LGBTQ community over the last two decades, even as their state has kept in place anti-LGBTQ policies and laws. Will Stone/KJZZ hide caption

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Will Stone/KJZZ

In Arizona, Advocating For The LGBTQ Community Starts In Local Politics

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LGBTQ people of color are twice as likely as their white counterparts to say they've been discriminated against because they are LGBTQ in applying for jobs and interacting with police. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

For LGBTQ People Of Color, Discrimination Compounds

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Nick Vargas talks with Dr. Kathryn Hall at The Source, an LGBT center in Visalia, Calif. Hall says that time and time again, her patients tell her they're afraid to come out to their other doctors. Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio hide caption

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Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio

'Here It Goes': Coming Out To Your Doctor In Rural America

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Harrison Browne, seen here playing for the Buffalo Beauts, says he feels lucky to be part of a league that accepts him and wants him to feel comfortable. Courtesy of the National Women's Hockey League hide caption

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Courtesy of the National Women's Hockey League

Even after the Supreme Court legalized same-sex marriage, there have been efforts to pass a religious freedom bill. LGBTQ rights advocates believe lawmakers anticipate support from the Trump administration. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

LGBTQ Advocates Fear 'Religious Freedom' Bills Moving Forward In States

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President Trump has decided to leave in place President Barack Obama's 2014 executive order protecting employees from anti-LGBTQ workplace discrimination while working for federal contractors. Here, a marcher in New York's Gay Pride march wears a modified version of a Trump campaign hat last summer. Bryan R. Smith/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Bryan R. Smith/AFP/Getty Images

Secretary of State John Kerry attends a meeting of foreign ministers at the NATO headquarters in Brussels on Dec. 6. On Monday, Kerry issued an apology for the State Department's historical mistreatment of LGBT people. JOHN THYS/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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JOHN THYS/AFP/Getty Images

Cleve Jones speaks outside the Supreme Court in June 2013. Hachette Books hide caption

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Hachette Books

LGBTQ Activist Cleve Jones: 'I'm Well Aware How Fragile Life Is'

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People celebrate outside the Supreme Court in Washington on June 26, 2015, after its historic decision on gay marriage. Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images

LGBT Rights Activists Fear Trump Will Undo Protections Created Under Obama

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The White House was illuminated in rainbow-colored light on June 26, 2015, after the Supreme Court issued a ruling that made same-sex marriage legal nationwide. Drew Angerer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Not Always A 'Thunderbolt': The Evolution Of LGBT Rights Under Obama

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Protesters gathered in prayer in front of the House gallery as Massachusetts lawmakers debated a transgender public accommodations bill Wednesday. The legislation passed by a wide margin. Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Boston Globe via Getty Images

Ethan, Adam, Jen and Allie Slipakoff live in Kennesaw, Ga. Allie is transgender and the family has learned that she is often the best teacher on transgender issues. Courtesy of the Slipakoff family hide caption

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Courtesy of the Slipakoff family

When The Kid Becomes The Teacher: On What It Means To Be Transgender

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New Jersey's Anti-Discrimination Law Is 'Just A Tool' To Protect Gender Identity

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Supporters of House Bill 2 gather for a rally at the North Carolina State Capitol in Raleigh, N.C., on April 11. A recent poll found that nearly 49 percent of North Carolinians support at least some part of the controversial law. Gerry Broome/AP hide caption

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Gerry Broome/AP

North Carolinians Who Support 'Bathroom Law' Say They're Being Drowned Out

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Unisex signs hang outside bathrooms at Toast Paninoteca in Durham, N.C. Sara D. Davis/Getty Images hide caption

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Sara D. Davis/Getty Images

Transgender Rights, The New Front In The Culture Wars

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Transgender student Nicole Maines (accompanied by her father, Wayne, and her twin brother, Jonas) speaks to reporters after winning on appeal a discrimination lawsuit against her school district. In 2014, Glamour magazine named Maines one of its 50 inspiring women of the year. Robert F. Bukaty/AP hide caption

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Robert F. Bukaty/AP

'Becoming Nicole' Recounts One Family's Acceptance Of A Transgender Child

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Diane Gira (left) and Valerie Nelson (right) pose with their son, Madison, in their home near Wahpeton, N.D. Maggie Penman/NPR hide caption

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Maggie Penman/NPR

Church Ceremonies Push North Dakota Town To Grapple With Gay Rights

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The small town of Wahpeton, N.D., is one of the places where conversations on same-sex marriage are playing out in schools, churches and families. Maggie Penman/NPR hide caption

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Maggie Penman/NPR

What We Talk About When We Talk About Gay Marriage

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Josh Kronberg-Rasner was the only openly gay employee at a food service company in Casper, Wyo. He was fired in 2012 shortly after being assigned a new manager. Miles Bryan/Wyoming Public Media hide caption

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Miles Bryan/Wyoming Public Media

For People Fired For Being Gay, Old Court Case Becomes A New Tool

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