Islamic State of Iraq and Syria Islamic State of Iraq and Syria

Relatives of Jordanian pilot Lt. Muath al-Kaseasbeh, who was captured by ISIS militants in Syria, protest Tuesday in front of the royal palace in Amman, Jordan. Jordan has suggested it might be willing to hold a prisoner exchange for his release. Jamal Nasrallah/EPA/LANDOV hide caption

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Jamal Nasrallah/EPA/LANDOV

Relatives of Jordanian pilot Lt. Muath al-Kaseasbeh, who was captured by ISIS militants in Syria, protest in front of royal palace in Amman, Jordan, Tuesday. Jordan has suggested it might be willing to hold a prisoner exchange for his release. JAMAL NASRALLAH/EPA /LANDOV hide caption

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JAMAL NASRALLAH/EPA /LANDOV

Free Syrian Army fighters run behind sandbags in Daraa Al-Mahata, in southern Syria, on Jan. 21. Many moderate rebels joined the uprising to fight against President Bashar Assad, but the U.S. plans to train them to fight the self-proclaimed Islamic State. Wsam Almokdad/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Wsam Almokdad/Reuters/Landov

Syrian Rebels Want To Fight Assad, But Now They'll Face ISIS

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Safi al-Kasasbeh and his wife Saafia are the parents of Moath al-Kasasbeh, the Jordanian air force pilot captured by the self-proclaimed Islamic State in Syria. The worried parents are proud of their son, but say Jordan should not be involved in the coalition against ISIS. Alice Fordham/NPR hide caption

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Alice Fordham/NPR

With A Son Missing, Family Questions Jordan's Mission Against ISIS

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A picture of French tourist and mountain guide Herve Gourdel, 55, who was killed after being kidnapped on Sept. 21 while hiking in Algeria's Djurdjura National Park. The leader of the group that killed Gourdel has been killed in a military attack. Farouk Batiche/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Farouk Batiche/AFP/Getty Images

The Islamist group Hamas, shown here in a rally in the Gaza Strip on Dec. 12, is the strongest faction in the Gaza Strip. The Islamic State, or ISIS, is not believed to be in the territory, though fliers purporting to be from the group have circulated in Gaza. They are widely believed to be fake, but both Israel and Hamas have tried to use them to their advantage. Mahmud Hams/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mahmud Hams/AFP/Getty Images

In Gaza, The Specter Of ISIS Proves Useful To Both Sides

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Many Yazidis, like the ones shown here, managed to flee the onslaught of the so-called Islamic State and made their way to relative safety, like this camp near the northern Iraqi border crossing of Zakho. However, some 5,000 Yazidis, many of them women, are still being held hostage by the Islamic State. EPA/Landov hide caption

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EPA/Landov

For Yazidi Women, Escaping ISIS Doesn't Mean The Ordeal Is Over

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A member of the Saudi border guards mans a machine gun at the border with Iraq in July. Since the so-called Islamic State launched its offensive this summer in Iraq, Saudi Arabia has sent thousands of troops to the region. Faisal Nasser/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Faisal Nasser/Reuters/Landov

Facing Threats From ISIS And Iran, Gulf States Set To Join Forces

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Alfons R. of Hamburg, Germany (shown in this undated photo), converted to Islam at age 17. Later, he went to Turkey, then Syria, to join ISIS. He was killed this past summer. Courtesy of Manfred Karg hide caption

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Courtesy of Manfred Karg

From German Teen To ISIS Jihadist: A Father's Struggle To Understand

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Secretary of State John Kerry, left, Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi, center, and Iraqi Foreign Minister Ibrahim al-Jaafari prior to a round table meeting of the global coalition to counter the Islamic State. Virginia Mayo/AP hide caption

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Virginia Mayo/AP

The Islamic Youth Council in Derna, in eastern Libya, is among the local militant groups from Egypt to Libya that have reportedly pledged allegiance to the self-proclaimed Islamic State. Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Reuters/Landov

With Cash And Cachet, The Islamic State Expands Its Empire

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