Tyson foods Tyson foods
Stories About

Tyson foods

A Tyson food product is seen in Montpelier, Vt., on Nov. 18, 2011. Tyson Foods says the company is closing two facilities that employ more than 1,600 people in an effort to streamline its U.S. poultry business. Toby Talbot/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Toby Talbot/AP

Workers line up to enter a Tyson Foods pork processing plant last month in Logansport, Ind. Some of the worst workplace coronavirus outbreaks have been in the meatpacking industry. Major meatpackers JBS USA, Smithfield Foods and Tyson have said worker safety is their highest priority. Michael Conroy/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Conroy/AP

Thousands Of Workers Say Their Jobs Are Unsafe As Economy Reopens

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/872856822/874568718" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tyson Foods says it has suspended operations at its pork plant in Columbus Junction, Iowa, pictured in February 2013, after more than two dozen workers got sick with COVID-19. Ryan J. Foley/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ryan J. Foley/AP

The Feed the Future Tworore Inkoko, Twunguke project hosts a meeting in the Gataraga sector of Rwanda to recruit farmers to grow chickens. If the farmers commit to four days of training and pass a competency test, they are given a backyard coop worth about $625, as well as the means to obtain 100 day-old chicks, vaccines, feed and technical advice. Emily Urban/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Emily Urban/NPR

Poultry workers at major U.S. meat-processing plants are highly susceptible to repetitive-motion injuries, denied bathroom breaks and are most often immigrants and refugees. Earl Dotter/Oxfam hide caption

toggle caption
Earl Dotter/Oxfam

Tyson Foods says it has already reduced its use of human-use antibiotics by 80 percent over the past four years. Here, Tyson frozen chicken on display at Piazza's market in Palo Alto, Calif., in 2010. Paul Sakuma/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Paul Sakuma/AP

Tyson Foods To Stop Giving Chickens Antibiotics Used By Humans

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/402736017/402736018" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Chickens gather around a feeder in a Tyson Foods poultry house in Washington County, Ark. April L. Brown/AP hide caption

toggle caption
April L. Brown/AP

Is Tyson Foods' Chicken Empire A 'Meat Racket'?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/276981085/279405678" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript