hospital acquired infections hospital acquired infections

Each year, hundreds of hospitals lose 1 percent of their Medicare payments through the Hospital-Acquired Conditions Reduction Program. The penalties — now in their fourth year — were created by the Affordable Care Act to drive hospitals to improve the quality of their care. Maskot/Getty Images hide caption

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Maskot/Getty Images

Nursing homes and hospitals need to work harder to keep water systems from being contaminated with bacteria that cause Legionnaires' disease, the CDC says. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

Wounds infected with antibiotic-resistant staph often heal, but the bacteria can remain inside a person's body and cause future infections. Michelle Kondrich for NPR hide caption

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Michelle Kondrich for NPR

Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles has been penalized in all three years since the creation of a Medicare program to reduce patient-safety issues in hospitals. FG/Bauer-Griffin/GC Images/Getty Images hide caption

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FG/Bauer-Griffin/GC Images/Getty Images

Ideally, the best place to care for someone ill with Ebola is at the end of a hall in a room with its own bathroom, anteroom and entrance, says Dr. Jack Ross of Hartford Hospital. Jeff Cohen/WNPR hide caption

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Jeff Cohen/WNPR

One U.S. Hospital's Strategy For Stopping Ebola's Advance

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Dorothea Handron suffered an infection after a surgeon unknowingly pierced her bowel during a hernia operation. She became so ill that doctors placed her in a medically induced coma for six weeks. Jim R. Bounds/AP Images for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Jim R. Bounds/AP Images for Kaiser Health News

Hospitals To Pay Big Fines For Infections, Avoidable Injuries

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Fewer People Are Getting Infections In Hospitals, But Many Still Die

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