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Isela was denied life insurance because her medication list showed a prescription for the opioid-reversal drug naloxone. The Boston Medical Center nurse says she wants to have the drug on hand so she can save others. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Nurse Denied Life Insurance Because She Carries Naloxone

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Patrick Semansky/AP

A Philadelphia police officer holds a package of the overdose antidote naloxone while on patrol in the Kensington neighborhood of Philadelphia in April 2017. Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images

Opioid Antidote Can Save Lives, But Deciding When To Use It Can Be Challenging

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Some sixty "Opiod Overdose Kits" have been added defibrillator boxes in Bridgewater State University dorms and academic buildings like this one. Tovia Smith / NPR hide caption

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Tovia Smith / NPR

On College Campuses, Making Overdose Medication Readily Available

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The contents of the naloxone kit inside an AED box located in the VA West Roxbury cafeteria. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

VA Adding Opioid Antidote To Defibrillator Cabinets For Quicker Overdose Response

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A man holds a sample of the opioid antidote Narcan during a training session at a New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene office in March. Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images

A man checks out an anti-overdose kit he was given at a clinic. With America confronting an opioid epidemic, Walgreens says it will stock naloxone spray at all of its pharmacies. Richard Lautens/Toronto Star via Getty Images hide caption

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Richard Lautens/Toronto Star via Getty Images

A test strip designed to help doctors check a patient's urine for fentanyl is being distributed in the Bronx to encourage users of heroin or other opioids to check what's in their syringe before they inject. Mary Harris/WNYC hide caption

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Mary Harris/WNYC

An Experiment Helps Heroin Users Test Their Street Drugs For Fentanyl

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People in their mid-40s to mid-60s are more likely than any other group to be prescribed opioids with benzodiazepines. Both kinds of drugs can hamper breathing and mixing them is especially risky. Erwin Wodicka/iStock hide caption

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Erwin Wodicka/iStock

In Prince's Age Group, Risk Of Opioid Overdose Climbs

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In Boston, Edmund Hassan, a deputy superintendent of emergency medical services, and his colleagues regularly revive people who have overdosed on opioids. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Reversing Opioid Overdoses Saves Lives But Isn't A Cure-All

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Katie Serio, director of treatment and prevention at the Council on Alcohol and Substance Abuse of Livingston County, N.Y., trains a group of school nurses to use the overdose antidote naloxone at Dansville High School. Michelle Faust/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

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Michelle Faust/Side Effects Public Media

School Nurses Stock Drug To Reverse Opioid Overdoses

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Tina Wolf demonstrates the use of naloxone to community members in Lindenhurst, N.Y., during an overdose prevention training. Georgia Dolan-Reilly (left) of the Suffolk County Prevention Resource Center helped with the training. Kevin Hagen for NPR hide caption

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Kevin Hagen for NPR

Teaching Friends And Family How To Reverse A Drug Overdose

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Several states distribute Naloxone hydrochloride, also called Narcan, to treat opium-based drug overdoses. But only one company manufactures the drug, and the price has spiked in recent years. Toby Talbot/AP hide caption

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Toby Talbot/AP

'Magic' Overdose Drug Works, But Demand And Price On The Rise

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