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An unidentified 15-year-old student at a high school in Cambridge, Mass., vaped near campus in April. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

FDA Intensifies Crackdown On E-Cigarette Sales To Teenagers

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Julien Lavandier, a Colorado State University student, started smoking e-cigarettes as a high school sophomore. He says he's now hooked on Juul and has been unable to quit. John Daley / CPR News hide caption

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John Daley / CPR News

He Started Vaping As A Teen And Now Says Habit Is 'Impossible To Let Go'

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Nicotine, heavy metals and tiny particles that can harm the lungs have been found in e-cigarette aerosol, according to the surgeon general. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

E-Liquid (right) with labeling that resembles kid-friendly candy (left). FDA/Flickr hide caption

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FDA/Flickr

Federal Government Sends Warning To Vaping Companies

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Scientists are finding that, just as with secondhand smoke from tobacco, inhaling secondhand smoke from marijuana can make it harder for arteries to expand to allow a healthy flow of blood. Maren Caruso/Getty Images hide caption

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Maren Caruso/Getty Images

Are There Risks From Secondhand Marijuana Smoke? Early Science Says Yes

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A JUUL e-cigarette for sale at Fast Eddie's Smoke Shop in Boston. The sleek devices are easy to conceal, which makes them popular with teenagers. Suzanne Kreiter/The Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Suzanne Kreiter/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

The state of New York is putting e-cigarettes into the same category as regular tobacco cigarettes, under new restrictions signed into law this week. Here, a man uses a vape device in London last summer, next to a No Smoking sign. Tolga Akmen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tolga Akmen/AFP/Getty Images

The liquid used in e-cigarettes comes in fruit and candy flavors like cherry and peppermint. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images

Teens' Use Of E-Cigarettes Drops For The First Time, CDC Says

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California is the second state to raise the legal age for purchasing tobacco products from 18 to 21. A similar law went into effect in Hawaii on Jan. 1. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images

E-cigarettes work by heating up a fluid that contains the drug nicotine, producing a vapor that users inhale. The devices are most popular among young adults, ages 18 to 24, a federal survey indicates. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Most E-Cigarette Users Are Current And Ex-Smokers, Not Newbies

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Vapor from an e-cigarette obscures the user's face in a London coffee bar. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

E-Cigarettes Can Churn Out High Levels Of Formaldehyde

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Jonathan Franzen, pictured here at The New Yorker Festival Fiction Night in 2009, won the National Book Award for his third novel, The Corrections. Joe Kohen/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Kohen/Getty Images

A woman tries electronic cigarettes at a store in Miami. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

FDA Moves To Regulate Increasingly Popular E-Cigarettes

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