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A robotic arm works on the production line at Volvo's factory in Ridgeville, S.C. But other essential jobs, including major portions of final assembly, are still left to people. Camila Domonoske/NPR hide caption

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Camila Domonoske/NPR

Even In The Robot Age, Manufacturers Need The Human Touch

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Tremaine Smalls (center) attaches parts to an engine at Volvo's plant in Ridgeville, S.C. The automaker has shifted its exports to Europe as the result of the U.S. trade war with China. Camila Domonoske/NPR hide caption

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Camila Domonoske/NPR

Trump's Trade War Forces Volvo To Shift Gears In South Carolina

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A man stands outside a Tesla dealership in Berlin on Jan. 4. On Friday, Tesla announced it would lay off 7 percent of its workforce, cutting some 3,000 jobs. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

People at the Ford display at the Essen Motor Show fair in Essen, Germany, in December 2017. The automaker has announced it will be cutting some jobs in Europe to reduce costs. Patrik Stollarz/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Patrik Stollarz/AFP/Getty Images

Engineers track progress of construction at a Toyota plant in Kentucky in 1986. It was one of several factories built in the 1980s by Japanese automakers in the U.S. as a result of voluntary limits on Japanese auto exports. AP hide caption

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AP

Can A Reagan-Era Policy Offer An Alternative To Tariffs?

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Steve Tramell is mayor of West Point, Ga., home to a Kia auto plant that employs thousands. He's worried about the potential impacts that proposed import tariffs on auto parts and cars would have on his town. Johnny Kauffman /WABE hide caption

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Johnny Kauffman /WABE

Trump's Proposed Auto Tariffs Threaten Kia Plant In Georgia

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Jeep Wranglers are displayed at a Manhattan Fiat Chrysler dealership. The automaker's latest quarterly earnings announcement comes at a time of deep uncertainty for the company. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Fiat Chrysler's New CEO Faces Twin Challenges: China And Tariffs

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Elon Musk speaks at the International Astronautical Congress on Sept. 29 in Adelaide, Australia. On Wednesday, the Tesla CEO took analysts and the media to task. Mark Brake/Getty Images hide caption

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Elon Musk To Analysts: Stop With The 'Boring, Bonehead Questions' On Tesla

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A 2018 Ford Expedition goes through the assembly line at a Ford plant Oct. 27, in Louisville, Ky. Higher-profit SUVs and trucks are making up a larger share of auto sales, boosting the industry's fortunes. Bill Pugliano/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

Auto Industry Healthy Enough To Withstand Next Downturn, Analysts Say

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Chevrolet Camaros are lined up at General Motors' Lansing Grand River Assembly Plant in Michigan in 2015. Automakers in the U.S. say if costs go up as a result of a renegotiated NAFTA, they would be less competitive. Rebecca Cook/Reuters hide caption

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Rebecca Cook/Reuters

Automakers Say Trump's Anti-NAFTA Push Could Upend Their Industry

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Citi Bike users pedal through the streets of Manhattan. Some members of Generation Z, the younger generation following the millennials, are less inclined to own cars and lean more toward bike-sharing and ride-sharing services. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Generation Z May Not Want To Own Cars. Can Automakers Woo Them In Other Ways?

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American troops use a Jeep in 1943 to clear land for Army camps in England. Fox Photos/Getty Images hide caption

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Fox Photos/Getty Images

Jeep: Why This American Icon Could Soon Be Part Of A Chinese Company

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Tesla Motors CEO Elon Musk speaks at the unveiling of the Model 3 in Hawthorne, Calif., on March 31, 2016. The first Model 3 is due to roll off the assembly line Friday. Justin Pritchard/AP hide caption

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Justin Pritchard/AP

As First Model 3 Rolls Off The Line, Can Tesla Sustain Momentum?

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Emirati men check a Tesla vehicle during a ceremony in Dubai in February. The electric -vehicle maker recently announced the opening of a new Gulf headquarters in the United Arab Emirates. Karim Sahib/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Karim Sahib/AFP/Getty Images

Trucks, including an armored car, pass through U.S. customs in 2016 in Laredo, Texas. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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Trump Vows 'Big Border Tax' For U.S. Manufacturers That Move Jobs Abroad

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Employees work on an engine production line at a Ford factory in Dagenham, England. Many American firms based in the U.K. are concerned Brexit will adversely impact their businesses. Carl Court/Getty Images hide caption

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How U.S. Businesses In Europe Are Already Planning For Brexit

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Alija/Getty Images

How To Buy A Car: Start With Some Patience

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Technicians and engineers work on a 2017 Acura NSX at the Honda Motor Co. Acura Performance Manufacturing Center in Marysville, Ohio, on March 8. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

Honda Tries To Race Ahead With Its New Acura NSX Hybrid

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The Buick Envision, built in China, was on display at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit. It will soon go on sale in the U.S. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

With Growing Investments, China's Influence In Autos Is Expanding

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