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fishing industry

Austin Steeves packages lobsters after hauling traps on his grandfather's boat in Casco Bay, Portland, Maine. Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Warming Waters Push Fish To Cooler Climes, Out Of Some Fishermen's Reach

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A fisherman loads a catch into baskets at sea aboard a Spanish boat. Two vessels flying the Spanish flag were signaled out for "going dark" in a new report issued by the conservation group Oceana. Marcel Mochet/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Marcel Mochet/AFP/Getty Images

A global map showing where all fishing vessels were active during 2016. Dark circles show the vessels avoiding exclusive economic zones around islands, where they aren't allowed. Global Fishing Watch hide caption

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Global Fishing Watch

Scallop fishermen discard their bycatch near Montauk, N.Y. These waters are some of the most productive fishing grounds on the Eastern Seaboard. Jon Kalish for NPR hide caption

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Jon Kalish for NPR

Fish market workers in Jersey City, N.J., prepare a bluefin tuna for shipment to some of New York's top sushi restaurants. Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images

Maine's lobster fleet has a growing number of women who, like Sadie Samuels, are running their own boats, and busting stereotypes along the way. Murray Carpenter for NPR hide caption

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Murray Carpenter for NPR

More Women Move Into Maine's Rough And Risky World Of Lobstering

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A fisherman holds out a fish for a seal off of a boat owned by Carlos Rafael in New Bedford, Mass. Rafael was the biggest fishing magnate in America's most lucrative port. As he faces sentencing for a scheme to cheat fishing quotas, many worry about the fate of local jobs if his empire is dismantled. Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe/Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe/Getty Images

Sentencing Approaches for New England's 'Codfather'

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Deckhand Patrick Gallager tosses the day's catch to the dock from the Fairwater Two charter boat. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

Who Gets To Fish For Red Snapper In The Gulf? It's All Politics

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Blue North is a new fishing vessel designed to catch Pacific cod using a Seafood Watch granted catch method. It also utilizes a stun table to render fish unconscious before processing. Courtesy of Blue North hide caption

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Courtesy of Blue North

Workers prepare to release thousands of fingerling Chinook salmon into the Mare Island Strait in Vallejo, Calif., in 2014. A new report names climate change, dams and agriculture as the major threats to the prized and iconic fish, which is still the core of the state's robust fishing industry. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

A fisherman in the Gulf of Mexico. Catch share programs allot fishermen a portion of the catch in advance, in hopes of keeping them from racing each other to sea, sometimes in risky weather. These programs are controversial. They also work, a new study finds. Courtesy of John Rae hide caption

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Courtesy of John Rae

Portland's Gulf of Maine Research Institute has designed a trawl net that aims to target species that can still be profitable while avoiding cod. Courtesy of Gulf of Maine Research Institute hide caption

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Courtesy of Gulf of Maine Research Institute