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Five years ago, Ripple Desai opened the Tandoori Taqueria in her hometown of Panguitch, Utah, tapping into a growing tourist market. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

Utah's 'Tandoori Taqueria' Brings Unexpected Indian Spice To Cowboy Country

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Chickpea flour is gaining attention thanks to its gluten-free binding properties. But the ingredient has been a staple of cooking for Indians, Pakistanis and many others for centuries. Pinkybird/Getty Images hide caption

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Pinkybird/Getty Images

Some of the 20 different types of rice used during the three-month festival Kochi-Muziris Biennale in India. Chefs served two varieties of rice every day, along with multiple dishes of vegetables and meat or seafood. Salam Olattayil/Courtesy of Edible Archives hide caption

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Salam Olattayil/Courtesy of Edible Archives

Rosogolla, also known as rasgulla, is a simple white spongy ball, made of chhena, an Indian version of cottage cheese, dunked in syrup. Above, newer, colorful iterations of this classic sweet are for sale during Rosogolla Day in Kolkata, India. Sandip Roy for NPR hide caption

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Sandip Roy for NPR

Fish curry inflected with coconut is a staple dish in the coastal Indian state of Goa. It's usually eaten accompanied by unpolished rice, fried fish and a dab of pickle. Once all the fish has been eaten up, the leftover curry is reheated over a low flame until it condenses and thickens. At that point, it is reborn as Kalchi koddi, which literally translates to "yesterday's curry." Joanna Lobo hide caption

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Joanna Lobo

A pot of rajma, a bean stew from the north of India, cooks on the stove. It's one of the recipes included in the new cookbook Bollywood Kitchen. Josh Loock/NPR hide caption

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Josh Loock/NPR

'Bollywood Kitchen': A Celebration Of Indian-American Cuisine

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There are many rituals associated with the Hindu Sindh holiday Cheti Chand, which falls on March 29 this year. One that continues to hold meaning for the author is the consumption of tahri, or sweet rice, during langar, the communal meal at the end of the celebration. Pooja Makhijani for NPR hide caption

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Pooja Makhijani for NPR

Train journeys in India were once defined by food, brought by passengers from their homes and purchased from vendors like this one. Passengers shared food with each other, exchanging stories and family histories, and sometimes striking new friendships that continued beyond the journey. But with growing availability of packaged food on trains, that culture is slowly dying. Dhiraj Singh/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Dhiraj Singh/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Daal — yellow, red, brown or black — is a staple across India. It is often described, inadequately, I think, as lentil soup. Except it's so much more. Arash James Iravan/Getty Images hide caption

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Arash James Iravan/Getty Images