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medicare fraud

While prescriptions for durable medical equipment, such as orthotic braces or wheelchairs, have long been a staple of Medicare fraud schemes, some alleged scammers are now using telemedicine and unscrupulous health providers to prescribe unneeded equipment to distant patients. Joelle Sedlmeyer/Getty Images hide caption

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Joelle Sedlmeyer/Getty Images

In the alleged scheme, Medicare beneficiaries were offered, at no cost to them, genetic testing to estimate their cancer risk. Al Drago/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Bloomberg/Getty Images

U.S. Justice Department Charges 35 People In Fraudulent Genetic Testing Scheme

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Medicare Advantage health plans, mostly run by private insurance companies, have enrolled more than 22 million seniors and people with disabilities — more than 1 in 3 people who are on some sort of Medicare plan. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

The same steep growth and use of big data that attracted venture capital cash to companies that administer Medicare Advantage plans have led to scrutiny of the companies by government officials. Federal audits estimate such plans nationwide have overcharged taxpayers nearly $10 billion annually. 123light/Getty Images hide caption

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123light/Getty Images

Good hospice care at the end of life can be a godsend to patients and their families, all agree, whether the care comes at home, or at an inpatient facility like this AIDS hospice. Still, oversight of the industry is important, federal investigators say. Bromberger Hoover Photography/Getty Images hide caption

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Bromberger Hoover Photography/Getty Images

HHS Inspector General's Report Finds Flaws And Fraud In U.S. Hospice Care

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A Texas lawsuit filed against 30 insurance plans in 15 states alleges that the companies overcharged Medicare for doctors' house calls. Laughing Stock/Corbis hide caption

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Laughing Stock/Corbis

Attorney General Loretta Lynch speaks about a federal crackdown on Medicare fraud. With her are HHS Inspector General Daniel R. Levinson (from left), HHS Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell, FBI Director James B. Comey and Assistant Attorney General for the Criminal Division Leslie R. Caldwell. T.J. Kirkpatrick/Getty Images hide caption

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T.J. Kirkpatrick/Getty Images

Union soldiers found that gunpowder was sometimes mixed with sawdust. Mathew B. Brady/AP hide caption

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Mathew B. Brady/AP

How A Law From The Civil War Fights Modern-Day Fraud

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Doctors who bill the federal government for a lot of services may be gaming the system, but there also may be a reasonable explanation. Aslan Alphan/Getty Images hide caption

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Aslan Alphan/Getty Images

High Charges By Doctors May Or May Not Be Red Flags For Fraud

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A check of Medicare's new database of payments to physicians confirms that at least $6 million in 2012 went to doctors who had been indicted or otherwise sanctioned. iStockphoto hide caption

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