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Allergenic foods. Top left to right: shrimp (crustacean), soy, milk, peanuts. Bottom left to right: tree nuts, wheat, egg, fish. Science Photo Library/ Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Library/ Getty Images

Have a food allergy? Your broken skin barrier might be to blame

Food allergies have risen in the United States over the last few decades. Research suggests that 40 years ago the actual prevalence of food allergies was less than 1%. But this year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released data showing that almost 6% of U.S. adults and children have a food allergy. But this trend is not present in all countries — and what people are allergic to varies globally. Today, we dive into the complex world of food allergies with Dr. Waheeda Samady. She's the Director of Clinical Research at Northwestern University's Center for Food Allergy and Asthma Research.

Have a food allergy? Your broken skin barrier might be to blame

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Scientists are hoping that seagrasses could act as a buffer against acidifying oceans. Lauren Sommer/KQED hide caption

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Lauren Sommer/KQED

Can Seagrass Save Shellfish From Climate Change?

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Bangs Island Mussels worker Jon Gorman sets juvenile mussels onto a rope that will be their home for the next year as they grow to market size. Fred Bever/Maine Public Radio hide caption

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Fred Bever/Maine Public Radio

Oysters, shown out of their shell, collect tiny plastic particles while in the water. These microplastics can eventually make their way into your dinner. Ken Christensen/KCTS Television hide caption

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Ken Christensen/KCTS Television

NOAA scientists estimate they saw about 10 billion sea scallops off Delaware and southern New Jersey this spring as part of an annual survey. Andrew Martinez/Science Source hide caption

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Andrew Martinez/Science Source

Crew members pull an oyster dredge in Tangier Sound of the Chesapeake Bay near Deal Island, Md., in 2013. A study found that the Chesapeake Bay shellfishery is a "hot zone" for ocean acidification. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Clams this fresh taste like tender calamari. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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Martin Kaste/NPR

In The Land Of Razor Clams, Dinner Hides Deep Within The Sand

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